ParisLemon

Sep 01

$400?! For A Smartwatch?!

$400?! For A Smartwatch?!

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Interstellar by Jordy Roelofs / Sysmatic

Oh yes.

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Interstellar by Jordy Roelofs / Sysmatic

Oh yes.

Durant signs lucrative deal to stay with Nike -

 Darren Rovell and Marc Stein:

With Durant on the verge of a move to Under Armour, sources told ESPN on Sunday that Nike exercised its right to match any rival shoe company’s offer to the Oklahoma City Thunder star. A source with knowledge of the deal later told ESPN that Durant has indeed signed with the Oregon-based company.

Nike countered Under Armour’s offer of between $265 million and $285 million and believes it will keep Kevin Durant for the next 10 years, sources told ESPN.

The most interesting aspect of this isn’t that Nike beat out Under Armour, it’s that Durant went with Nike even though Under Armour’s deal was said to include a huge chunk of Under Armour stock. This is the same type of deal Under Armour cut with the NFL owners in 2006 to get their foot in the door — and it’s worked out very well for the NFL ($4.5M turned into well over $100M). 

Hard to see the downside of going with Nike here, but it could end up being shortsighted by Durant.

(Source: 1jps, via bryan)

(Source: jeffreyweston, via buzz)

The Soderberghian style, sex, and settings of 'Out Of Sight' -

Noel Murray:

We should acknowledge how great George Clooney is in this movie. Jennifer Lopez is wonderful too—so much so that it’s a shame she didn’t stay the course as a movie star, rather than focusing so much of her energy on pop music—but Clooney has had such a strong post-Out Of Sight career that it’s easy to forget how this film righted his reputation. He’d made a ton of money with the first couple of films he starred in after leaving the TV series ER, but few critics took him seriously as an actor. Around the time Out Of Sight came out, I remember Clooney giving interviews in which he talked about how he was rich enough from Batman & Robin not to have to make any more movies he didn’t believe in. He also said that Soderbergh had cured him of some of his actorly tics, convincing him to stare straight ahead rather than always dipping his chin and bobbing his head. Nathan, you ask about memorable moments, and most of mine involve Clooney’s unexpected maturity and deadpan wit. My favorite example of the latter: When one of Ripley’s goons comes to escort Jack out of his office and says, “There are two ways we can do this,” to which Jack replies, “Yeah, what are they?” As for the former, I think again of that scene at the hotel bar with Karen, when Jack sighs that he’d rather they just be themselves, and bring everything they’ve lived and experienced into the bedroom. “Gary and Celeste, what do they know about anything?” he asks. What changed about Clooney as an actor is that he stopped being a Gary and started being a Jack Foley.

100% agree. This remains my favorite George Clooney role (narrowly ahead of Michael Clayton). And I also view it as the pivotal moment that “righted” his Hollywood ship. He easily could have veered off course as so many others have before him. But it was Out of Sight that put him on the trajectory to become arguably the biggest movie star in the world.

I also believe this is still Steven Soderbergh’s best movie. 

Aug 31

"Hard to tell, really." -

Clay Shirky on the death of newspapers:

When the Tribune Company recently got rid of their newspapers, the New York Times ran the story under a headline “The Tribune Company’s publishing unit is being spun off, as the future of print remains unclear.”

The future of print remains what? Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really.

It is sort of humorous/sad how reluctant most publications are to call the most obvious of spades a spade. You’d think there was bias or something.

China Invents Cinema Hell -

Amy Qin on the latest cinema trend emerging in China:

The new “bullet screen,” or danmu, model of movie-watching that has recently been introduced in select theaters in China can perhaps be most pithily summed up with the title of the 2010 Chinese action comedy “Let the Bullets Fly.”

In this case, the bullets don’t refer to actual bullets, but to text messages that audience members send via their mobile phones while watching the film. The messages are then projected onto the screen, so that at any given time the scene may be overlaid with multiple “bullets,” or comments, scrolling across the screen.

Pop-Up Video. But in a theater. With content populated by the crowd. Of teens. What could go wrong?

Aug 30

“You pay $150 billion for that, and it’s a lot of risk. You might never make any money. The Clippers make money, and they’re going to make more money. As a multiple of earnings, you’re paying less than you are for almost every tech stock. You have very limited downside because there will never be more than two teams in Los Angeles.” — Steve Ballmer, comparing investing his money in the Los Angeles Clippers versus tech stocks.

[video]

“It’s kind of like software. Version 1 was the failed attempt at keeping the Sonics, version 2 was the Kings, version 3 was the Bucks.” — Steve Ballmer, describing his attempts to buy an NBA franchise. Version 4, of course, was his successful bid to buy the Los Angeles Clippers for $2 billion.

The "New" Nintendo 3DS -

Kyle Russell:

While it’s nice to see a Nintendo release a faster version of its popular console with better controls, I can’t help be confused by how Nintendo chose to announce it. The New Nintendo 3DS is backwards compatible with older 3DS games, but it will also have its own exclusive titles. Is it supposed to be its own, new device, or not? If it is, I worry that Nintendo is shooting itself in the foot by not coming out with a bigger bang and a new name. This new device is an even smaller incremental jump than from the Wii to the Wii U, and anecdotally, most people I’ve asked over the last few years didn’t realize that those are two different systems.

Everything is just fine at Nintendo. Pay no attention to the weird repackaged half-product releases.

michiganathletics:

So close.

Go Blue.

michiganathletics:

So close.

Go Blue.

Email on the Go -

Robin Wauters:

Still, people continue to read more email on Apple-manufactured devices than any other device or platform. According to the study, Mac computers, iPhones and iPads were used to open 358 million SendGrid-delivered emails in the last year, compared to 320 million emails on Windows.

While the data is Europe-specific in this case, it’s interesting to think/see how many people primarily interact with email on their phones and/or tablets now. Certainly, it’s the main way I do. Since I always have one of those devices on me.