ParisLemon

Apr 15

nevver:

World’s first emoticon, 1648

Subtle.

nevver:

World’s first emoticon, 1648

Subtle.

It’s pretty amazing what go.com, which you’d think would be a key web domain — especially since it’s owned by Disney — resolves to. A completely broken, janky website that looks like it’s straight out of the 1990s. 
Complete with dozens of little blue links, awful banner ads, broken images, and auto-playing tiny video ads.
[via @omid and @monkbent]

It’s pretty amazing what go.com, which you’d think would be a key web domain — especially since it’s owned by Disney — resolves to. A completely broken, janky website that looks like it’s straight out of the 1990s. 

Complete with dozens of little blue links, awful banner ads, broken images, and auto-playing tiny video ads.

[via @omid and @monkbent]

...Unless Apple Buys Exxon -

Jason Snell:

In other words, in four years the wearables market might grow to be one-tenth the size of today’s smartphone market—in units shipped. Presumably the average selling price of wearable items will be a fraction of that of smartphones, meaning the dollar value of the wearables market is even more minuscule compared to the smartphone market.

All of which means that wearables, while dramatic and exciting and with huge potential to change people’s lives, are never going to rival smartphones in terms of market size. Same goes for smart TV boxes. These are interesting, fun areas of technological change. But the smartphone—that boring old Internet-connected 64-bit supercomputer in your pocket that just keeps improving year after year—is going to be the big dog in the tech world for years to come. Apple’s future success or failure will be dependent on the iPhone, and to a lesser extent the iPad, not on a smartwatch.

That’s exactly right. I’ve been saying this for a while: there is no industry, save maybe the oil business, that could yield the type of profits Apple is used to with the iPhone. And that points to a lot of disappointment in the eyes of Wall Street no matter what comes — unless Apple buys Exxon.

[video]

tylerhwillis:

Which of the following would be brighter, in terms of the amount of energy delivered to your retina:
1. A supernova, seen from as far away as the Sun is from the Earth, or 2. The detonation of a hydrogen bomb pressed against your eyeball?
Applying the physicist rule of thumb suggests that the supernova is brighter.
And indeed, it is … by nine orders of magnitude.

Eye-opening.

tylerhwillis:

Which of the following would be brighter, in terms of the amount of energy delivered to your retina:

1. A supernova, seen from as far away as the Sun is from the Earth, or
2. The detonation of a hydrogen bomb pressed against your eyeball?

Applying the physicist rule of thumb suggests that the supernova is brighter.

And indeed, it is … by nine orders of magnitude.

Eye-opening.

Yes, Another "3D" Smartphone, This Time From Amazon -

Zach Epstein apparently has some details (and images) of the forthcoming Amazon smartphone:

The device houses an additional four front-facing cameras that work with other sensors to facilitate the software’s 3D effects. One source tells us these four cameras, which are situated in each of the four corners on the face of the phone, are low-power infrared cameras.

The device’s extra cameras are used to track the position of the user’s face and eyes in relation to the phone’s display. This allows Amazon’s software to make constant adjustments to the positioning of on-screen elements, altering the perspective of visuals on the screen.

The result is a 3D experience without the need for 3D glasses or a parallax barrier in front the LCD panel like the solutions used by the Nintendo 3DS portable video game console and HTC’s EVO 3D smartphone from 2011.

While I’m hesitant to say so definitely before seeing it, this reeks of pure novelty. Just as it was with every other “3D” phone before it

The question you have to ask is: at the end of the day, does such a feature make for a truly better user experience? Or is it just a novelty trying to mask itself as a differentiating feature? Or worse, does it actually make the device harder to use?

Yes, the iPhone has a “parallax” effect with iOS 7. But Apple doesn’t shy away from it being purely ornamental. And, by the way, a lot of people hate that feature.

The Amazon Phone need only be an Amazon Prime Phone, not some weird, novelty-laden thing.

[video]

Ready player one. (at Google New York)

Ready player one. (at Google New York)

Apr 14

Everything In Its Right Place

My quest to write 500 words a day has really gone off the rails recently. It was always an ambitious goal, but I also sort of set it up for failure by not designating a time each day to write. So I found myself scrambling at the end of each and every day to get 500 words up. As I’m finally figuring out with email, everything happens more smoothly if you designate a time to do it and stick with it.

And a place.

The other problem with the 500 word goal was that this site simply didn’t seem like a great place for it. You see, I run this site on Tumblr. And while Tumblr is amazing for many things, it’s not particularly well-suited for longer-form writing. Yes, even just 500 words. The text box that pops open when you set out to do a text post says all you need to know: keep it short.

Read More

“I think if Dickens was alive today, he’d have been working for the BBC, until HBO offered him much more money.” — Roddy Doyle discusses television and his short story in this week’s issue of the magazine: http://nyr.kr/1mUhHxZ (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

(Source: burganprell)

David Fincher Out of Steve Jobs Movie -

Kim Masters:

A source with ties to the studio says Fincher potentially could re-enter negotiations but that the fee he is seeking is “ridiculous,” adding, “You’re not doing Transformers here. You’re not doing Captain America. This is quality — it’s not screaming commerciality. He should be rewarded in success but not up front.”

He apparently was asking for a $10 million up-front fee, as well as control over marketing. I say give it to him. Then get Christian Bale.

"Inventing is messy..." -

Jeff Bezos in his annual shareholder letter:

Failure comes part and parcel with invention. It’s not optional. We understand that and believe in failing early and iterating until we get it right. When this process works, it means our failures are relatively small in size (most experiments can start small), and when we hit on something that is really working for customers, we double-down on it with hopes to turn it into an even bigger success. However, it’s not always as clean as that. Inventing is messy, and over time, it’s certain that we’ll fail at some big bets too.

Always a good read.

[video]

blogoculaire asked: What is the percentage of time you use your iPad(s)/iPhone versus PC/MacBook(s). Can you make it to 100% soon?

I’d say it’s probably 70/30 on iDevices vs. MacBook. Most of the MacBook Air time is work-related. And that figure is so heavily tilted in the iDevices favor because I use the iPhone far more than any other device.

That said, when it comes to “general computing”, I much prefer to use the iPad Air (with the Logitech keyboard) for almost everything. But I suspect a rumored 12” Retina MacBook Air could tilt the numbers back in the MacBook favor, if only temporarily.