ParisLemon

Jul 09

dbreunig:


He’s calling you to reboot the 1980’s soap opera in which he had a supporting role.
(From Apple’s CarPlay website.)


I dunno, 9:41? That’s awfully early for that call.

dbreunig:

He’s calling you to reboot the 1980’s soap opera in which he had a supporting role.

(From Apple’s CarPlay website.)

I dunno, 9:41? That’s awfully early for that call.

[video]

sootmann said: So are you (and lefsetz) saying that existing automakers will be replaced by appliance-like Tesla-type makers, or that people will just start not driving? I get that kids today don't care about getting their licenses at 16-years-and-one-day like we used to, but if you think people will quit buying cars altogether, I doubt it. Kids will want cars once they have kids. What, you think you're gonna use Lyft to go school-practice-practice-store-home? That 300M people will move into walkable cities?

Yes, I believe we’re entering a time of decline for driving itself — certainly amongst the younger generations. It may be hard to see now because our world (especially in the U.S.) is so car-centric. But the pieces are coming into place that makes owning a car not only less attractive, but often unnecessary. 

Sure, it will hit dense urban areas first. But again, I see no reason why this doesn’t spread to all but the most remote reaches of the country. Things tend to sound crazy before they’re suddenly reality.

Anonymous said: Re "Kids Don't Care About Cars": So you think "kids" all want to drive the same $20K box? Do they all dress exactly the same, use devices for utility only too? The bottom line is there area so many things wrong about that piece that I wonder if the author has any clue about society, regardless of how technologically advanced it may be...

No, I believe that increasingly, they don’t care about driving anything. But maybe they will care what they’re driven in at certain times.

(This will obviously be true in denser cities at first. But I see no reason why this doesn’t spread to suburbs as well eventually.)

Jul 08

Sian Cain:

Houses Arryn, Greyjoy and Stark are sauvignon blancs, as are the White Walker and Wildling bottles. The Lannister and Baratheon families are pinot noirs, while fellow power-hungry houses Tyrell and Martell are a chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon respectively. The fearsome Dothraki tribes are a merlot, while the Night’s Watch and House Targaryen are represented by shiraz.

Collect them all.

Sian Cain:

Houses Arryn, Greyjoy and Stark are sauvignon blancs, as are the White Walker and Wildling bottles. The Lannister and Baratheon families are pinot noirs, while fellow power-hungry houses Tyrell and Martell are a chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon respectively. The fearsome Dothraki tribes are a merlot, while the Night’s Watch and House Targaryen are represented by shiraz.

Collect them all.

“There are a few things I have witnessed becoming obsolete in the past few years, the first being autographs. I haven’t been asked for an autograph since the invention of the iPhone with a front-facing camera. The only memento ‘kids these days’ want is a selfie. It’s part of the new currency, which seems to be ‘how many followers you have on Instagram.’” — Taylor Swift, on the future of the music business. Yes, I just quoted Taylor Swift. But it’s an interesting point about autographs and selfies.

"Enslaved by the rectangle for too long..." -

Liam Tung on the square — yes, square — BlackBerry Passport:

According to BlackBerry, the smartphone world has been enslaved by the rectangle for too long, which may be “limiting innovations”.

BlackBerry argues that the Passport’s girth will deliver a better viewing experience, in part because it can display 60 characters per line — much closer to the 66 characters typically seen in a book, compared to the 40 or so on rectangular devices.

One advantage of its width is that users won’t need to turn the phone to landscape mode to view e-books, view documents, or browse the web.

Let’s be clear: if this thing works at all, it will be because of the physical keyboard that many old school users still clamor for, and not because of a square screen. Though I do love the assertion that it’s too hard for regular smartphone users to turn their phones to the side — where they’d get a much wider display area than this square screen will offer. 

Jul 07

"Time catches up with everyone, even genius." -

Jacob Steinberg on the latest Wimbledon final in which Novak Djokovic outlasted Roger Federer:

Yet, if anything, this defeat should reinforce his belief that he can rule SW19 again and why bow out now when he clearly has so much left to give? His capacity to delight and enthrall us with the variety and majesty of his play remains intact and, lest we forget it, so does his ability to be a stubborn sod when we least expect it.

Absolutely true. And yet:

Yet it was also predictable that Djokovic, who served unusually well, had joy targeting Federer’s backhand or that he outlasted him when it turned into a battle of stamina. Federer ran 4,096 metres to Djokovic’s 3,773 and his first serve failed him near the end, his 32-year-old legs growing weary under the strain. Time catches up with everyone, even genius.

Such a great match. As Federer himself quipped at the end, “See you next year.”

Disruption.

Disruption.

[video]

On Social Media, Some Are Susceptible to Internet Outrage -

Teddy Wayne:

Perhaps the real problem, Professor Martin suggested, isn’t our rage but our rashness, and its relationship to our easily accessible devices.

“The Internet exacerbates impulse-control problems,” he said. “You get mad, and you can tell the world about it in moments before you’ve had a chance to calm down and think things through.”

What a load of horseshit! I just read this article and I never fucking do this.

(Source: partition--please, via slimblackjeans)

Jul 06

Kids Don't Care About Cars -

Bob Lefsetz:

Just because cars have lasted a century, that does not mean they’re here to stay, that does not mean they’re not ripe for disruption. Cars are the newspapers of today. Something oldsters can’t live without and youngsters can.

The basic premise is you’ve got to go. How you get there is irrelevant. Furthermore, the costs of car ownership…the insurance and the gas, never mind the maintenance, none of them appeal to a youngster who believes all costs should be baked in.

A common mistake is thinking that just because something has been around for a long time, it’s impervious to disruption. If anything, the long incumbency makes it more ripe for disruption. Everything — everything — eventually gets disrupted. 

(And yes, I now hate using the word “disruption” as much as everyone else because it has basically been neutered of meaning and turned into pure marketing. But it’s simply the best term here.)

Daimler Invents Optimus Prime -

Melissa Eddy:

Daimler demonstrated its vision Thursday along a stretch of the A14 autobahn near Magdeburg in eastern Germany, the culmination of years of innovation. It says the vehicle — called the Mercedes-Benz Future Truck 2025, a nod to the year the carmaker hopes it will be introduced — is capable of responding to traffic while driving completely autonomously down a freeway at speeds of up to 85 kilometers per hour, or 52 miles per hour.

I mean, how on Earth did Daimler miss the obvious and perfect promotional summer movie tie-in? This is not the “Mercedes-Benz Future Truck 2025” — that sounds like a name Microsoft would come up with. This is Optimus Prime.