I linked to this the other day, but what the hell, I’m linking again. David Carr:

For the last six months, my magazines, once a beloved and essential part of my media diet, have been piling up, patiently waiting for some mindshare, only to be replaced by yet another pile that will go unread. I used to think that people who could not keep up with The New Yorker were shallow individuals with suspect priorities. Now I think of them as just another desperate fellow traveler, bobbing in a sea of information none of us will see to the bottom of. We remain adrift.

I’m someone who used to rush home from school on days that I new the newest copy of a magazine I subscribed to was due to arrive at my home. I still subscribed to many of those magazines, on my iPad, and I basically never open them.

I really can’t remember the last time I read one. Maybe 18 months ago?

Ira Boudway on Steve Ballmer’s attempt to by the Los Angeles Clippers for $2 billion:

Ballmer, as the numbers show, is offering more than any previous NBA buyer—and more than any buyer would pay for an asset with this caliber of financial performance. Over the last five years, according to Bank of America, NBA teams have sold for an average of 3.4 times their annual revenue. Ballmer’s bid comes in at 12.1 times an estimated annual revenue of $164.9 million for the year ended in June. In other words: Donald Sterling’s hypothetical $5 billion buyer doesn’t exist, and there’s probably nobody other than Ballmer willing to go as high as $2 billion.

Poor Steve Ballmer. Not literally, of course. But he just can’t seem to catch a break when it comes to his pursuit of an NBA team.

Finally got around to reading most of the initial reviews of Amazon’s Fire Phone. Brutal. Really brutal.

Not that I’m surprised. At all.

I just hope Amazon isn’t surprised. Because if they are, they would seem to have a fairly large problem on their hands. That is, they’re completely out of touch with reality — or more importantly, with their customers. No one wants to have to tilt a phone to use it. It’s a gimmick gone rogue. 

As I asked back in April, when the 3D (“Dynamic Perspective”) functionality was still just rumored:

The question you have to ask is: at the end of the day, does such a feature make for a truly better user experience? Or is it just a novelty trying to mask itself as a differentiating feature? Or worse, does it actually make the device harder to use?

Now we know the answer.

Mark Gurman, reporting that OS X Yosemite will likely be coming at the end of October, alongside:

Also in the cards for the Mac side, sources say, are at least a couple of next-generation Mac lines. Sources say that Apple is finishing up work on both a smaller MacBook with a high-resolution display and a new desktop computer, either an iMac or a standalone monitor, with a 4K resolution screen.

The new MacBook will include a Retina Display that is approximately 12-inches diagonally and it will include a much thinner and slightly lighter aluminum body, the sources said. Apple believes that this new Retina MacBook will be a significant step forward in the laptop industry, and it is currently unclear if Apple will label this machine as a smaller MacBook Pro, a new MacBook Air, or as an entirely new line.

Yes, my mythical perfect last laptop. And a 4K monitor (maybe iMac?) to boot — answering this question (though the “retina” question remains). Hold on to your butts.