Eric Mack on Dreadnoughtus (great name), the largest dinosaur found yet:

To reach its gargantuan size, Dreadnoughtus would have had to have spent most of its time eating large amounts of plants. The dinosaur’s body was comparable to the size of a house, with a 37-foot-long neck balanced by a 30-foot-long tail. Lacovara says it likely would have spent hours just standing in one place and eating everything it could reach.

The one found in Argentina was 85 feet long and 65 tons — and not yet fully grown.

Mark Harris on the summer box office this year:

Should studios be worried? I think they should be, a little. It’s probably not a complete coincidence that the year’s biggest surprise hit, The Lego Movie, is a self-aware fable predicting an eventual revolt by a captive audience that’s tired of being told that everything is awesome when everything isn’t.

Ian Kar:

According to Noyes, while banks control the card-present/not-present rates,  the networks negotiate the rates with payments processors. The differences can be dramatic. Apple was apparently adamant about getting the card-present rates and told issuers that it would assume some of the fraud risk inherent in every transaction by providing a secure element via biometric authentication (its TouchID feature) and location data provided through an NFC chip. The Apple payments platform will work with all of their cards.

Banks offered the discounted fee for two reasons: for the Apple payments platform to accept all of the cards from the issuers, and for Apple to assume some of the liability by including two secure elements that will authenticate transactions — location data via the NFC chip, and biometric security. This is essentially a wash for the financial services industry: they lowered fees for Apple for the privilege of being included in Apple’s payments initiative, but managed to put some of the transaction risk to Apple.

If all of this is true, it’s potentially massive. And it may speak to why Apple may have finally greenlit the use of NFC technology in their products, even though they could have presumably done everything they wanted with the already-implemented Bluetooth LE tech.

Speaking of Motorola and Her, here’s David Pierce on the Moto Hint:

Motorola makes the same case for the Hint that Jawbone does for the latest Era, saying that Google Now and voice search have revived the power of talking to your phone. Yet there’s no getting around the Bluetooth headset stigma, so Motorola did its best to make it look like you’re not wearing one. Or wearing anything at all. The Hint is about the size of a peanut, and nestles entirely in your ear; it looks astonishingly like the earpiece Joaquin Phoenix’s character wears throughout Her, a fact that’s not lost on anyone at Motorola. And the intention is very much the same: you’re not meant to put it in and take it out, but to wear it all the time.

I’m a fan of the Era, mainly for the reasons listed above (not to talk on the phone). But I wish it were even smaller, which the Hint is, so I could conceivably wear it all the time.

Also, the Hint’s charging case looks great.

Brent Lang:

A subsidiary of a distribution and exhibition company, CJ 4DPlex provides the technology for 112 4D theaters in more than 20 countries throughout Asia, Europe and the Americas. Tickets stateside cost $22 on average, but for that premium price, moviegoers get to kick back in motion-based seating in a theater that spays water, emits odors and jerks visitors around, all synchronized to the on-screen action.

And I thought the texting thing was bad.

Finally, a worthy use of “FINALLY.”

But really, Sonos has always been one of those confounding companies to me. Their hardware is so good, but the software is such crap. And the general set up process for their products is one of the worst things I’ve ever encountered (which is undoubtedly related to the software).

It was always like they were taunting you: “You want this? How badly to you want this? Bad enough to put up with this?” Hopefully this helps.