#Apple

Mark Gurman, reporting that OS X Yosemite will likely be coming at the end of October, alongside:

Also in the cards for the Mac side, sources say, are at least a couple of next-generation Mac lines. Sources say that Apple is finishing up work on both a smaller MacBook with a high-resolution display and a new desktop computer, either an iMac or a standalone monitor, with a 4K resolution screen.

The new MacBook will include a Retina Display that is approximately 12-inches diagonally and it will include a much thinner and slightly lighter aluminum body, the sources said. Apple believes that this new Retina MacBook will be a significant step forward in the laptop industry, and it is currently unclear if Apple will label this machine as a smaller MacBook Pro, a new MacBook Air, or as an entirely new line.

Yes, my mythical perfect last laptop. And a 4K monitor (maybe iMac?) to boot — answering this question (though the “retina” question remains). Hold on to your butts.

Insert the joke here: Times change — The times they are a-changin’ — Think different.
But really, this IBM deal seems like a smart partnership for Apple. They could either double their workforce to fully go after enterprise, or they can partner with a massive company already doing that. 
Yes, Apple likes to control every aspect of what they do. But enterprise is not a core competency and won’t be any time soon. Yet customers are demanding it. Hence, this deal.
And yes, this is potentially very bad news for Microsoft — which, oddly, is now the one trying to do everything itself. 

Insert the joke hereTimes changeThe times they are a-changin’Think different.

But really, this IBM deal seems like a smart partnership for Apple. They could either double their workforce to fully go after enterprise, or they can partner with a massive company already doing that. 

Yes, Apple likes to control every aspect of what they do. But enterprise is not a core competency and won’t be any time soon. Yet customers are demanding it. Hence, this deal.

And yes, this is potentially very bad news for Microsoft — which, oddly, is now the one trying to do everything itself

Matthew Panzarino:

One of the most intriguing components of the new iTunes Extras system is that they aren’t set in stone. Because they’re based on a flexible framework that Apple offers to studios, and they’re served from the cloud, they can be added to over time.

There is potential here to create a living library that allows additional content to be served to your existing library. That’s a big selling point for digital purchases over physical ones, just as many studios are finally getting on the digital bandwagon.

For me, this truly is a “finally”. Like Panzarino, I was a huge DVD buff — not because of the format itself, but because of the extras included with the films. Apple started to include them long ago, but only in a half-assed way, and oddly not on the Apple TV.

Scanning over the extras highlighted by Apple, I still am a bit saddened to see only a few titles with commentary tracks. Those were hands-down my favorite extras. But, as noted, studios can add additional content over time, and Apple ensures it will be available for free.

Buster Hein on Steve Jobs’ love of sushi — and one place in Japan, in particular:

Before Jobs died in October 2011 he made one last hire – Toshi Sakuma. With the fast-paced lifestyle weighing on him, Sakuma decided to sell the restaurant. Unable to find a quick buyer, Jobs offered Sakuma a job at Caffè Mac where Apple employees can still go to enjoy the sushi Jobs loved for a quarter century.

The restaurant was set to close on October 7th, and according to Nobi, Jony Ive’s secretary scheduled a reservation and mentioned a special guest (presumed to be Jobs) would be joining. A cancellation soon followed when news of Jobs’ death broke.

Kaygetsu’s last day of business was the same day as Steve’s funeral.

Sad.

John Gruber:

New Apple didn’t need a reset. New Apple needed to grow up. To stop behaving like an insular underdog on the margins and start acting like the industry leader and cultural force it so clearly has become.

Apple has never been more successful, powerful, and influential than it is today. They’ve thus never been in a better position to succumb to their worst instincts and act imperiously and capriciously.

Instead, they’ve begun to act more magnanimously.

100% agree. And I think part of the reason why it took Apple so long to come around here was that their recent success has happened so quickly. Just a decade ago, Apple stock was the adjusted equivalent of $2/share. Revenues that quarter were $2 billion. Profit was $106 million.

Apple’s profit last quarter was just over $10 billion — yes, their profit is now 5x the amount of revenue they made a decade ago. The profit is up 100x. That’s insane.

In that span, Apple has gone from the Mac company, to the iPod company, to the iPhone company. And they have a nice little side business in the iPad which is larger than the Mac or iPod ever were. 

It can be hard to grow into such rapid success. What do you do when you’re no longer the underdog? You can either still act like you’re the underdog, or you can grow up. Apple is now growing up.

Speaking of Apple and gaming, here’s Sean Heber:

Apple now has everything they need to disrupt the game console industry in a way that none of them see coming. I predict that we’ll see a new AppleTV update (and hardware) this fall along with a new app extension type for AirPlay. AirPlay will become about more than just streaming video to your AppleTV - instead that’ll simply be one of the things you can do with it. Apps (mostly games, I suspect) will be able to bundle an AirPlay extension inside - just like how apps can now bundle photo editing or sharing extensions as of iOS 8. The key difference is where the AirPlay extension app actually executes - instead of running on your device itself from within another host app, the AirPlay extension app will be automatically uploaded to whatever AppleTV you are currently AirPlaying with and will run directly on the AppleTV natively instead. This means no video streaming lag and minimal controller lag. Your iPhone would then turn into a generic game controller with onscreen controls or, if you have a physical shell controller attached to your iPhone, it activates that instead. The game controller inputs are then relayed to the AppleTV and thus to the AirPlay extension app using the new game controller forwarding feature.

This is a very interesting idea — apps as air(play)borne viruses that “infect” the Apple TV unit. It sounds almost crazy enough to be true.

Remember that while it’s stated to have no internal storage, the Apple TV (the hockey puck variety) does actually have 8 GB of memory. This would certainly be enough for any single app (of which games are almost always the largest) to fully reside temporarily, while playing. 

The wild card here in my mind, is the input. The long-rumored new Apple TV box has long been said to be built around some sort of new control paradigm. Will a “magic wand” or some other such controller work with these games as well? Or will there be something else? Or will it simply rely on an iPad/iPhone?

[via John Gruber]