#adidas

Chad Bray:

Several news outlets reported that Adidas, the German sportswear maker, was likely to succeed Nike. The Financial Times reported that such a deal could be worth up to £750 million over 10 years, making it one of the most lucrative equipment sponsorship deals in sports.

Crazy. Though perhaps not as crazy as the fact that American car-maker Chevrolet will be the main sponsor of the team starting this year (that deal cost $599 million over eight years).

Yes, Man U will be wearing jerseys with a giant Chevrolet logo on the front. (Nike will still be there this year since that deal ends next year.)

Brendan Greeley 

On June 12 in São Paulo, Brazil will play Croatia in the first game of this year’s World Cup. The corporate spend on team sponsorships alone, according to Ohlmann, will total almost $400 million. Nike will sponsor 10 national teams, more than it ever has before—and one more than Adidas. Nike has Brazil, Portugal, and Ronaldo. Adidas has Spain, Germany, and Lionel Messi, the Argentine who has won the Ballon d’Or four times. As in every World Cup since 1970, the ball on the field will be Adidas’s.

Fascinating war between the two. Sponsorship, no longer image, is everything.