#apple maps

publishforlove asked:

What are your thoughts on the new google map app for iPhone?

It’s great. I’ve been using it all morning to get around. It’s worth it for the clearly superior place search functionality alone.

Judging from my inbox/replies/etc, it seems like a lot of folks expect me to take a shit on the app. I’m not going to do that. As I’ve always said, my only requirement to use something is that it be the best. And that’s clearly the case here.

Google Maps is superior to Apple Maps in most (though not quite all) ways. And I’m excited to have it back on the iPhone. I’ll be using it constantly.

thedailywhat
thedailywhat:

Finally, Official ‘Ice And Fire’ Maps of the Day: (Embiggen.) Better late than never: While many impressive fan-made maps have made the rounds, Game of Thrones author George R.R. Martin finally is giving us “an official collection of insanely detailed maps — with versions that track the movements of all the main characters.”
The Lands of Ice and Fire is out Tuesday.
[io9]

*Insert Apple Maps joke here.*

thedailywhat:

Finally, Official ‘Ice And Fire’ Maps of the Day: (Embiggen.) Better late than never: While many impressive fan-made maps have made the rounds, Game of Thrones author George R.R. Martin finally is giving us “an official collection of insanely detailed maps — with versions that track the movements of all the main characters.”

The Lands of Ice and Fire is out Tuesday.

[io9]

*Insert Apple Maps joke here.*

Since we’re just about week into regular, everyday usage of Apple Maps with iOS 6, I started this Branch to get some impressions beyond the hyperbolic headlines. And guess what? People are actually posting well-reasoned, thoughtful, and balanced insights into the feature. Yes, this is actually taking place on the internet!

Google Maps Product Manager Thor Mitchell:

As you may know, last year we introduced limits on the number of free maps that developers could show daily through the Google Maps API. Since then, we’ve been listening carefully to feedback, and today we’re happy to announce that we’re lowering API usage fees and simplifying limits for both Styled and regular maps.

"Since then" — let’s be clear, that happened in October of last year. In the eight months since then, what has changed? Not much beyond a little company called Apple entering the space.

I’ve talked to a lot of developers over the past several months — not one of them can understand why Google made these changes in the first place. It led big startups like Foursquare to abandon Google Maps on the web. Even with the high rates, it can’t be a huge amount of money for Google relative to their overall revenues.

But still, they did not make this change until after Apple maps were unveiled. And they didn’t just cut prices, they slashed them by 8x. 8x!

Can’t imagine why.

Update: One reason for the price change initially was apparently spam. As in, Google thought that by charging sites for heavy usage, they’d cut back on the “Live Nude Girls in Houston!!!” embedded map ads. Still, it’s not clear how they couldn’t see the downside for big *real* partners.

There’s been quite a bit of hoopla surround Apple’s decision not to include public transit directions in their new iOS Maps application, and instead outsource this to developers (many of whom have already been doing this for a while). On one hand, this sucks. On the other, Cocoanetics brings up a great point: it may actually be a somewhat savvy move.

As they note about a particular situation in Vienna:

A birdie tweeted into my ear that this was a result of a back-room deal aimed at neutering Google’s power by making Google Maps worthless for navigation in Vienna. And thus two apps became the only sources of routing information in Vienna. So even though Google was “working hard” they did never stand a chance against the secret deal between several monopolistic companies.

Even in the U.S., you have cities like San Francisco which have MUNI, Caltrain, and BART, all of which make up public transportation (and not even all of it). Currently, Google Maps picks up all those feed, but what if one of them decides they want to cut their own deal with another app or make their own? And what about taxi information and data from services like Uber? 

I suspect Apple didn’t want to get into all of this because it’s a headache. If it’s important enough to users and the third-party solutions aren’t good enough, of course they will — but for now, they’re giving this a shot. 

As an aside, I’m in London right now and used Google Maps to plan an Underground ride from the airport to the city. Google’s public transit directions gave me a wrong stop at which transfer. In fact, it gave me the only stop I *couldn’t* transfer from. It’s the little things that kill. And these transit systems are full of little things.