#books

Anonymous asked:

Regarding the R+L=J Theory: George RR Martin is known to hate predictability, especially when it applies to his own work. This theory has been around awhile, and frankly I was hoping it wouldn't reach the masses. Now that nearly every book reader and likely a huge portion of the show’s viewers know about this “in retrospect so obvious” revelation, what are the odds Martin changes the story now that one of, if not the, greatest plot twists/surprises is out in the wild.

Probably pretty decent, I imagine. Maybe with a flashback to the “Red Bedding” to reveal what really happened?

marc

marc:

If you’re a Game of Thrones / ASOIAF fan, you may have already heard of the R+L=J fan theory. But, I promise you have never seen it presented in such exhaustive detail. I, for one, have always believed this theory to be true.

Warning: If this theory is true then it could be considered a plot spoiler for a future book or TV season.

Having come to this conclusion myself, I’m guessing this is almost certainly true.

And yes, this is sort of spoiler-y, though not really cause no one save George R. R. Martin knows for sure (well and maybe the show’s writers).

Sian Cain:

Houses Arryn, Greyjoy and Stark are sauvignon blancs, as are the White Walker and Wildling bottles. The Lannister and Baratheon families are pinot noirs, while fellow power-hungry houses Tyrell and Martell are a chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon respectively. The fearsome Dothraki tribes are a merlot, while the Night’s Watch and House Targaryen are represented by shiraz.

Collect them all.

Sian Cain:

Houses Arryn, Greyjoy and Stark are sauvignon blancs, as are the White Walker and Wildling bottles. The Lannister and Baratheon families are pinot noirs, while fellow power-hungry houses Tyrell and Martell are a chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon respectively. The fearsome Dothraki tribes are a merlot, while the Night’s Watch and House Targaryen are represented by shiraz.

Collect them all.

It’s not the Iron Throne I see when I’m working on ‘The Winds of Winter.’ It’s not the Iron Throne I want my readers to see. The way the throne is described in the books … HUGE, hulking, black and twisted, with the steep iron stairs in front, the high seat from which the king looks DOWN on everyone in the court … my throne is a hunched beast looming over the throne room, ugly and assymetric … The HBO throne is none of those things.
George R. R. Martin, on one key difference between his books and the show.
I wish we had more episodes. I’d love to have 13 episodes. With 13 episodes, we could include smaller scenes that we had to cut, scenes that make the story deeper and richer.

George R. R. Martin, speaking to Dana Jennings about how his “A Song of Fire and Ice” series of novels compares to HBO’s Games of Thrones television show.

Given the massive ratings success HBO is seeing with Thrones, it seems insane that they wouldn’t okay more episodes if asked. Yes, the show is hugely expensive to produce but it’s now HBO’s most successful series — ever. Plus, ten episodes each season isn’t enough for me either.