#box office

Ben Fritz:

The actual revenue value for Hollywood studios of a box office dollar—the only financial data point typically reported publicly—varies widely. In China, where practically no one buys DVDs—at least not legitimately—and digital and TV distribution businesses are minimal, studios receive only about 27 cents on the box office dollar, according to internal studio analyses viewed by The Wall Street Journal. In the U.S., with its comparatively robust post-theatrical businesses, $1 of box office translates into about $1.75 of total revenue over a decade.

The recent rhetoric out of Hollywood seems to center around how well films are doing overseas. Forget what you see in the domestic box office, they say. Which is misdirection, at best. Bullshit, at worst.

Maane Khatchatourian:

Following the “Avengers” bump, “Guardians” is continuing Marvel’s stellar track record of boffo openings. Marvel pics have collectively grossed $6.3 billion since 2008’s “Iron Man,” making it the most successful film franchise after “Harry Potter.” “Guardians” will hopefully lift the summer box office, which is down more than 20% from 2013.

Once again showcasing why it was genius of Disney to buy Marvel.

Janko Roettgers:

The new PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) Entertainment and Media Outlook 2014-2018 report shows that revenue from online video services is set to overtake box office revenue in 2018. The report actually predicts that box office sales are going to slightly grow this year to $11.4 billion, up from $10.8 billion in 2013, and after being more or less flat since 2009. PwC predicts that box office revenue will keep an annual growth rate of 3.1 percent in the coming years, which means that people will spend $12.5 billion on movie tickets in 2018.

But revenue from subscription video services like Netflix in particular is growing at a much faster rate, from $3.3 billion in 2013 to a projected $10 billion in 2018. Add transactional video services like iTunes and Google Play, where you pay to rent or buy a digital copy of a movie or TV show, and you arrive at a total of $14 billion in revenue in 2018.

This is nothing new — DVDs sales used to outpace box office sales as well. And this will undoubtedly lead Hollywood to pour more resources into supporting these newer services, which is good.

The difference here is that it’s hard to see a world where the box office regains the crown — as it did against DVDs way back when. Hollywood literally cannot raise ticket prices fast enough to offset the mediocre film lineups they continue to pump out.

José Arroyo:

In June 2013, at a University of Southern California event with George Lucas, Steven Spielberg predicted an implosion of the film industry. The failure at the box office of “tentpoles”, mega-budget movies that are designed with potential sequels in mind and anchor a studio’s release schedule, “are going to go crashing to the ground, and that’s going to change the paradigm,” he said.

This may not seem to be happening, but Anne Thompson shows us in her interesting and illuminating new book, The $11 Billion Year, that the prediction has already come true. White House Down, After Earth, The Lone Ranger, Turbo and R.I.P.D. all tanked at the box office and the whole cinematic apparatus, the paradigm of production, distribution, exhibition and the technological, economic and political structures that underpinned it, have indeed changed.

While I previously stated that I believed this would happen faster than anyone realized, there’s something obvious overlooked in this analysis: every single one of those films mentioned in the above paragraph, sucked.

This isn’t rocket science. 

Two interesting nuggets from this week’s box office report by Andrew Stewart — first:

So far, “Gravity” has amassed a stellar $170.6 million domestically, of which Imax has contributed more than 22%, with $38 million. Premium formats, particularly Imax, have become a major selling point for “Gravity,” lifting its playability.

A great film, hugely cinematic in scope shown on IMAX is like gasoline on a fire when it comes to making money. Hollywood will not only recognize this, they’ll go overboard and everything will be on IMAX next summer. Naturally, they’ll forget the key “great film” and “hugely cinematic in scope” elements and many films won’t do well in the format.

Second:

Fox’s “The Woverine” is the latest film to get the coveted B.O. boost from China, bowing there with $13.6 million and bringing the film’s total international tally to nearly $260 million. Globally, “Wolverine” has cumed more than $390 million.

The Wolverine, while a massive improvement over the first Wolverine film, wasn’t a huge success in the U.S. (certainly not when compared to the other X-Men films). And yet, it’s doing twice as well overseas as it is in the U.S., which means we’ll definitely get another one. The U.S. continues to matter less and less when it comes to the box office.

thedailyfeed
thedailyfeed:

The Avengers may have saved the world, but they also saved Disney after the disastrous flop of “John Carter.” The superhero movie now ranks third all-time in receipts, trailing only “Avatar” and “Titanic.”

As high as “The Avengers” is soaring on the home front, it’s doing even better overseas. Based on characters from Marvel Comics, the behemoth has garnered more than $800 million since it opened in late April to foreign markets, bringing its total box office haul to $1.36 billion.
“I’ve never seen a movie that has sprinted to these numbers so fast,” said Paul Dergarabedian, president of the box office division of Hollywood.com. “It doesn’t seem to be slowing down.”


Yeah but see, this is bullshit. The movie — which was great, by the way — “sprinted to these numbers so fast” because ticket prices are now insanely higher than they ever have been, especially when you take 3D and IMAX into account. 
Look at the list above, there are two — TWO — movies pre-2000. And they were released in 1999 and 1997. Either movies have gotten better and/or more popular — or, much more likely, it has to do solely with the ticket prices.
This data comes from BoxOfficeMojo, which also happens to keep a chart that’s adjusted for inflation. Sadly, the numbers above are worldwide box office and BoxOfficeMojo only does the adjustment for domestic sales, but you still will get the picture.
Unadjusted, domestically, The Avengers is now the #3 movie of all time with $552 million — ahead of The Dark Knight and behind Titanic. But when adjusted for inflation, The Avengers is… #35. On that chart, it’s behind Love Story and just ahead of Spiderman. 
That’s not to downplay The Avengers success — its run has been amazing. But come on, to say that now “ranks third all-time in receipts” is misleading. It ranks third in money made, yes, but it’s a sort of silly metric. Hollywood should count and publish tickets sold in absolute numbers.
Sadly, they never will because such numbers wouldn’t be nearly as impressive. In fact, they’d likely show a decline in movie-going throughout the past couple of decades. Instead, looking at these charts, you’d think everything is up, up, and away.

thedailyfeed:

The Avengers may have saved the world, but they also saved Disney after the disastrous flop of “John Carter.” The superhero movie now ranks third all-time in receipts, trailing only “Avatar” and “Titanic.”

As high as “The Avengers” is soaring on the home front, it’s doing even better overseas. Based on characters from Marvel Comics, the behemoth has garnered more than $800 million since it opened in late April to foreign markets, bringing its total box office haul to $1.36 billion.

“I’ve never seen a movie that has sprinted to these numbers so fast,” said Paul Dergarabedian, president of the box office division of Hollywood.com. “It doesn’t seem to be slowing down.”

Yeah but see, this is bullshit. The movie — which was great, by the way — “sprinted to these numbers so fast” because ticket prices are now insanely higher than they ever have been, especially when you take 3D and IMAX into account. 

Look at the list above, there are two — TWO — movies pre-2000. And they were released in 1999 and 1997. Either movies have gotten better and/or more popular — or, much more likely, it has to do solely with the ticket prices.

This data comes from BoxOfficeMojo, which also happens to keep a chart that’s adjusted for inflation. Sadly, the numbers above are worldwide box office and BoxOfficeMojo only does the adjustment for domestic sales, but you still will get the picture.

Unadjusted, domestically, The Avengers is now the #3 movie of all time with $552 million — ahead of The Dark Knight and behind Titanic. But when adjusted for inflation, The Avengers is… #35. On that chart, it’s behind Love Story and just ahead of Spiderman. 

That’s not to downplay The Avengers success — its run has been amazing. But come on, to say that now “ranks third all-time in receipts” is misleading. It ranks third in money made, yes, but it’s a sort of silly metric. Hollywood should count and publish tickets sold in absolute numbers.

Sadly, they never will because such numbers wouldn’t be nearly as impressive. In fact, they’d likely show a decline in movie-going throughout the past couple of decades. Instead, looking at these charts, you’d think everything is up, up, and away.