#breaking bad

Brett Martin interviewed Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan for GQ’s Men of the Year edition:

Martin: I think everybody knew the ending would be a big deal, but it really turned into as big and feverish a phenomenon as I can remember. What happened? 

Gilligan: Have you ever been sitting at your desk and you crumple up a piece of paper and, without even looking, you just toss it over your shoulder and it goes straight into the wastebasket? You didn’t think about it. You didn’t stress about it. You just did it. And now that you’re thinking about it, you could never do it again in a million years, no matter how hard you tried. That’s what this was like. We worked our butts off, but everybody works their butts off in TV. We tried to make the best show it was humanly possible to make, but you know, the guys on According to Jim did the same thing. As to why this thing hit…I could make up some stream of nonsense, but honestly…I wish I could explain it, because then I might have a fighting chance on TV in the future. The truth is, I just have to be satisfied that it happened at all.

Humble.

Leo Barraclough:

Jeffrey Katzenberg, the CEO of DreamWorks Animation, told an audience of TV execs at the Mipcom mart in Cannes that six weeks ago he offered to commission three extra episodes — totaling 180 minutes — of “Breaking Bad.” He offered to pay $25 million per episode, he said.

Also interesting:

He explained that he had intended to show the extra content as six-minute segments over 30 days online.

He planned to charge viewers from around 50 cents to 99 cents per episode.

Alas, it was not to be.

Schumpeter:

The first lesson from “Breaking Bad” is that high-growth businesses come from unexpected places. Mr White uses his skills as a chemist to revolutionise the slapdash meth industry (he was a researcher before becoming a teacher). He is not alone. William Thorndike of Harvard Business School (HBS) studied eight bosses whose firms outperformed the S&P 500 index more than 20-fold over their business careers. He found that they were all outsiders who brought fresh perspectives on their industries. Clayton Christensen, also at HBS, argues that great entrepreneurs look at the world through a “marginal lens”. It so happens that Bill Gates, a university drop-out working in a then marginal bit of the computer industry, started Microsoft in Mr White’s home-town, Albuquerque, before moving to Seattle.

Three things help our chemistry teacher turn an insight into a flourishing business. The first is huge ambition. He is not in the “meth business” or the “money business”, he says. He is in the “empire business”. The second is product obsession. Other dealers might peddle “Mexican shoe-scrapings” on the ground that addicts care little about quality. He produces the king of meth, so pure that it turns blue, and would rather destroy an entire batch than let an inferior product be traded under his brand. The third is partnerships and alliances. He spots talent in a former pupil turned drug-dealer, Jesse Pinkman, and forms a strong working relationship with him. He also contracts distribution to a succession of local gangs so that he can concentrate on the higher-value-added part of the business: cooking and quality control.

Brilliant. 

evangotlib
heisenbergchronicles:

5x16: FelinaWritten & Directed by Vince GilliganAir Date: 9/29/13
Don’t Forget: This episode will run an extra 15 minutes long, so make sure your DVRs are set properly. Talking Bad will air immediately following at 10:15/9:15c broadcast live from Aaron Paul’s viewing party at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, joined by Vince, Bryan and the cast.
Spoiler Policy: Once an episode has aired in the Eastern Time Zone, I consider it fair game. So if you are DVR’ing, time-shifting, etc. and you don’t want to be spoiled in any way, I suggest you avoid this blog, and frankly all of Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook. Go with the media blackout.

heisenbergchronicles:

5x16: Felina
Written & Directed by Vince Gilligan
Air Date: 9/29/13

Don’t Forget: This episode will run an extra 15 minutes long, so make sure your DVRs are set properly. Talking Bad will air immediately following at 10:15/9:15c broadcast live from Aaron Paul’s viewing party at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, joined by Vince, Bryan and the cast.

Spoiler Policy: Once an episode has aired in the Eastern Time Zone, I consider it fair game. So if you are DVR’ing, time-shifting, etc. and you don’t want to be spoiled in any way, I suggest you avoid this blog, and frankly all of Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook. Go with the media blackout.

Willa Paskin of Wired dives into the business behind the resurrection of Arrested Development on Netflix:

Whatever our televisual drug of choice—Battle­star Galactica, The Wire, Homeland—we’ve all put off errands and bedtime to watch just one more, a thrilling, draining, dream-­influencing immersion experience that has become the standard way to consume certain TV programs. We’ve all had the hit of pleasure after an installment ends on some particularly insane cliff-hanger and we remember that we can watch the next episode right now. It’s a relatively recent addition to the pantheon of slightly illicit yet mostly harmless adult pleasures, residing next to eating ice cream for dinner, drinking a beer with lunch, and having sex with someone you probably shouldn’t.

Yep. Also interesting:

Yet traditional television networks still apportion their series in weekly episodes over four to eight months, allowing binge-­watching only in retrospect, even though, for an increasing number of viewers, binge-­watching isn’t just a way to catch up on a season that has already wrapped but a better viewing experience altogether. Why let networks and advertisers get in the way of that? Which may explain what Sarandos says, that the audience for Breaking Bad is bigger on Net­flix than it is on AMC. (One of the few hard numbers Net­flix has shared is that 50,000 of its subscribers watched all 13 episodes of Breaking Bad’s season four the day before the new season premiered on AMC.)

The audience for Breaking Bad is bigger on Netflix than it is on AMC. Think about that for a second.