#bugs

I Got Bugs

Since the moment it was unveiled at WWDC in June of last year, I’ve been a big fan of iOS 7. While I certainly understand the people who hate change, I am not one of those people. In technology, I welcome change — especially big, bold changes. At the very least, it shows that a company isn’t afraid to experiment. More importantly, it shows that a company isn’t content to rest on its laurels.

So I embraced the gaudy neon and I entered our newly flat world excited. And I remain convinced that in just about every way, iOS 7 is a huge upgrade over the previous iterations. Except one. And it’s a big one.

The software is so inexplicably and inexcusably buggy.

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Nate Waddoups, Senior SDE at Microsoft answering “What is so great about Microsoft?” on Quora:

The Windows team invests a mind-boggling amount of time, hardware, and people into maintaining compatibility. There are bugs in Windows that could have been fixed years ago, but can’t be, because that would break applications that (deliberately or accidentally) depend on those bugs. Bug-for-bug compatibility is a problem, but breaking backward compatibility would be a much bigger problem, so even as the lowest layers of the operating system are revised and rewritten, the layers that applictions talk to (the application programming interface, or API) are carefully tested to ensure that no changes are visible to the application.

Bugs as a feature. Can’t imagine why so many of us ditched Windows years ago.