#chrome

Nilay Patel reviewing the new 13-inch MacBook Air:

13 hours and 29 minutes. That’s all you really need to know — that’s how long the new MacBook Air running Safari lasted running The Verge Battery Test, which cycles through a series of websites and images at 65 percent brightness. Run time in Chrome was shorter, at 11 hours and 29 minutes, but both are still ridiculously impressive. In fact, it’s the record for a laptop running our test without an external battery.

A few of my own thoughts:

1) Wow.

2) And this is running OS X Mountain Lion — OS X Mavericks is supposed to come with even more battery optimizations when it ships in the fall. That’s scary to think about.

3) I’ve noticed this about Safari versus Chrome as well on my laptops. No idea why that is.

Vijith Assar:

Since <blink> won’t blink in Blink, Firefox would be the only remaining browser that allows text to actually flash using the <blink> element. In the messy world of Internet technology, where the browsers often can’t even agree about the size at which to draw a simple box, that is as clear a signal as one can reasonably hope for: perhaps it’s time to retire <blink>.

A few hours after Google unveiled its plans for Chrome and Blink, a manager on Mozilla Japan’s internationalization team, Masayuki Nakano, filed a new ticket in the company’s internal bug-reporting system to suggest that Firefox do just that. After a few rounds of discussion, Nakano altered the necessary code in about a day’s worth of work, and submitted his changes on April 14th. Starting with version No. 23 of Firefox, Gecko, Mozilla’s internal rendering engine, will no longer support the <blink> element.

So long <blink>, it’s been an awful ride.

Andy Rubin is out, Sundar Pichai is in.

This is a fascinating and surprising move given all the success Android has seen in recent months. I won’t attempt to speculate as to why this change is happening now — I’m sure we’ll get plenty of that over the next few days. What I do know is that Sundar Pichai, the Google executive who has been leading Chrome (and will continue to lead Chrome as well as Android — read into that what you will), is a great choice to take over.

I’ve had the opportunity to meet Pichai a number of times over the years — thanks mainly, I can only assume, to my obsession with tracking Chrome in my writing days — and found him to be one of the most thoughtful and open-minded execs I have ever met.

This genuinely makes me excited about the future of Android — even if you’ll still have to pry my iPhone from my cold, dead hands.

lilly
lilly:

Not exactly news, but lots of good 3rd party apps replacing Apple’s built-in apps. I also like gmail (on iPhone, but not on tablet) and Calvetica, but here’s my current dock. Anyone using anything better for contacts &amp; outbound dialing?

Ditto on Mailbox replacing Mail and Fantastical replacing Calendar (though I use both since I much prefer the month-view of the built-in Calendar). I&#8217;m still Safari over Chrome on iOS. Love the fast tab-switching (by swiping left and right) but none of my bookmarklets seem to work yet on Chrome for iOS. Also, I do notice it rendering a tad bit slower than Safari for certain sites.
As for Phone, what is that? Is that like an app to test your hearing that people born before 1980 use? Not clear why anyone would use that.

lilly:

Not exactly news, but lots of good 3rd party apps replacing Apple’s built-in apps. I also like gmail (on iPhone, but not on tablet) and Calvetica, but here’s my current dock. Anyone using anything better for contacts & outbound dialing?

Ditto on Mailbox replacing Mail and Fantastical replacing Calendar (though I use both since I much prefer the month-view of the built-in Calendar). I’m still Safari over Chrome on iOS. Love the fast tab-switching (by swiping left and right) but none of my bookmarklets seem to work yet on Chrome for iOS. Also, I do notice it rendering a tad bit slower than Safari for certain sites.

As for Phone, what is that? Is that like an app to test your hearing that people born before 1980 use? Not clear why anyone would use that.

Good find by Cnet’s Stephen Shankland:

It looks like Chrome users, not just Android users, will get access to Google Now, the search giant’s technology for bringing weather reports, trip departure reminders, birthday alerts, nearby restaurant reviews, and more to the attention of Android users.

Google Now is one of the few recent Google software projects I’m legitimately excited about. It’s very well done and seemingly getting better by the day.

thedailywhat
thedailywhat:

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars
If you’re running on Chrome browser, check out Google’s latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

Pretty awesome, but only works in Chrome.

thedailywhat:

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars

If you’re running on Chrome browser, check out Google’s latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

Pretty awesome, but only works in Chrome.

thenextweb
thenextweb:

Google Chrome was released on September 2, 2008. That means the browser is more than four-years-old. Google is only celebrating today, however, since its browsers birthday fell on a Sunday that happened to be part of a long weekend. The result is the Chrome Time Machine, which attempts to “track Chrome’s journey from a better web to your web.”
The new site lets you travel through key moments in Chrome’s short history over the past four years. Oh, and since Google is feeling generous, you may even get a special birthday gift from the Chrome team if you find the hidden clue and type in “the secret code.”
(via Google Chrome Turns Four)

Pretty nifty. She&#8217;s come a long way.

thenextweb:

Google Chrome was released on September 2, 2008. That means the browser is more than four-years-old. Google is only celebrating today, however, since its browsers birthday fell on a Sunday that happened to be part of a long weekend. The result is the Chrome Time Machine, which attempts to “track Chrome’s journey from a better web to your web.”

The new site lets you travel through key moments in Chrome’s short history over the past four years. Oh, and since Google is feeling generous, you may even get a special birthday gift from the Chrome team if you find the hidden clue and type in “the secret code.”

(via Google Chrome Turns Four)

Pretty nifty. She’s come a long way.

Karen Grunberg on the Chrome team:

This build fixes a security issue with Adobe Flash.

Flash for Android dies tomorrow. It’s time Google killed it on the web too. I get their initial rationale behind baking it in to Chrome (security, mainly and the “complete web”), but now it’s just propping it up — and in a big way since Chrome is now the most popular browser.

But, but, but so many sites (and especially ads) still use Flash in some way, they’ll say. Sure, but if the world’s most popular browser ended support, we’d see that fade quickly. Just look at what happened on the mobile web thanks to iOS.

Google: let Flash die. 

Viet-Trung Luu, from the Google Chrome team:

With last week’s Chrome Stable update, we took a major step forward in security by bringing an even deeper level of sandbox protection to Adobe Flash Player on Windows. Since 2010, we’ve been working with Adobe to sandbox the Flash Player plug-in to protect users against common malware. Now, thanks to a new plug-in architecture, Flash on Windows is inside a sandbox that’s as strong as Chrome’s native sandbox, and dramatically more robust than anything else available. And for the first time ever, Windows XP users have a sandboxed Flash, making them much safer online. 

That’s great — it only took two years to get this working on one platform. Here’s a thought: I imagine an even more secure way to go about things would be to NOT BUNDLE FUCKING FLASH IN THE FIRST PLACE.

Chris Ziegler on the default inclusion of Flash in Chrome:

Google: solve this. Chrome is too important to the health of the internet for this to be anything other than a severity one issue. If Flash is mucking something up in a way that you can’t solve in Chrome alone, drop Flash from your release channel until Adobe gets its act together. It’ll hurt (I’ll feel it as much as anyone, trust me), but desperate times call for desperate measures.

I love Chrome, it has been my browser of choice for several years now. But the continued insistence on including Flash by default is getting ridiculous. In my own un-scientific study, it’s the cause of 99.9% of the problems not just with my web browser, but with my computer in general. 

Yes, Flash Blocker, click-to-run, etc. It’s ridiculous to include software that is so buggy and problematic by default. 

Google’s stance used to be that bundling Flash in Chrome would help with security (since Flash is so often exploited and few people take the time to update it). But in our increasingly mobile world (where Flash never came to life), I think we’re moving towards a better option: no Flash, period.