#cnn

Rob Brunner:

Another way Bourdain stays engaged is by constantly experimenting with technology. As equipment has improved over the years, the show has become more visually accomplished. In addition to high-end cameras like $16,000 Sony F3s with cinema-quality lenses and more modest equipment such as Canon 7Ds, the team now regularly uses GoPros, often in unexpected ways. In the Shanghai episode, they rigged up what they refer to as “shot cam,” a GoPro attached to a shot glass that captures, to dizzying effect, the liquor’s-eye view during a night of revelry. They have used bags of risotto for makeshift tracking shots (“risotto cam”) and turned a Hot Wheels track into a camera dolly. Bourdain is especially excited about the possibility of shooting an upcoming show entirely on iPhones.

The “shot cam” is genius. The iPhone thing should be very much possible with the iPhone 6/6+.

Also love this:

Bourdain now has a term for such corporate meddling: being asked to “eat a shit sandwich.” It’s one of the few meals he flat-out refuses to consume. “Given a choice between eating the sandwich and not having a television career, I would happily not have a television career,” he says. “Most people eat the sandwich.” He quit, taking the show to Travel Channel.

Most people definitely eat the sandwich.

Brian Stelter for NYT:

Fans of CNN may have noticed over the weekend that James Earl Jones’s voice is back, proclaiming “This is CNN” in his authoritative baritone. Its restoration was a symbolic first act by Jeff Zucker, the new chief executive of CNN Worldwide, whose first official day on the job was Monday.

The Force is strong with this one. (Seriously though, who decided to stop airing that in the first place?!)

cnnmoneytech

I’m confused as to what exactly I’m accused of here. I posted a link to Microsoft’s side of the argument. And I followed up with Google’s response. As a result, CNN staff writer David Goldman seems to think he has me in some sort of GOTCHA!

Newsflash for Goldman: my personal blog is not The New York Times. I post links to things I find interesting throughout the day with a short blurb about them. Occasionally I write longer posts where I dive deeper, but that’s no longer my primary job. 

Yes, it sucks that I wrote the post burning down your industry after I left, but that was also the point. A (now) outsider’s perspective on the state of the industry. 

Feel free to not consider my personal blog the paper of record for the industry. Having said that, I’m still not sure why the two links from opposing viewpoints constitutes a GOTCHA!