#comics

Maane Khatchatourian:

Following the “Avengers” bump, “Guardians” is continuing Marvel’s stellar track record of boffo openings. Marvel pics have collectively grossed $6.3 billion since 2008’s “Iron Man,” making it the most successful film franchise after “Harry Potter.” “Guardians” will hopefully lift the summer box office, which is down more than 20% from 2013.

Once again showcasing why it was genius of Disney to buy Marvel.

Marc Graser:

While George Lucas had built a world around “Star Wars” through movies, TV shows, comicbooks, novels, videogames and other forms of entertainment, storylines were developed by separate teams creating what’s been called an “Expanded Universe” that veered away from what was seen onscreen by audiences.

As a result of the plethora of “Star Wars”-related characters, creatures, spaceships and worlds created for those properties, Lucasfilm has formed a new story group to oversee all “Stars Wars” creative development, according to Kathleen Kennedy, president of Lucasfilm, that will connect all aspects of storytelling moving forward.

Controversial idea, no doubt. But I think the right one. If Disney is going to utilize the franchise to its full potential, this seems like a must.

Alexander Huls:

Blur your eyes, and they might have all been the same tedious, manipulative movie. I felt nothing watching these characters disappear off-screen, hurtling toward whatever lies beyond. I’m no sociopath. The problem is that death at the movies has died. The movie industry has corrupted one of cinema’s — if not all of fiction’s — most emotionally taxing moments into hollow formula, the kind of thing that passes in the blink of a plot point leading to a literal, if not figurative, explosive finale that takes up half the budget. Considering this, it’s odd that death’s killer is the new, risk-averse economic logic of Hollywood.

Hard to argue given the plots of so many movies these days — naturally, many based on comics. Hollywood has conquered death — and cheapened it in the process.

Adam B. Vary:

That kind of unmistakable branding is a precious creative commodity in Hollywood. “On any given weekend, you release a movie from Paramount or Universal or Warner Bros., but [audiences] are kind of brand agnostic,” said the senior studio exec. “But when it’s Marvel in this universe, I think that that brand is establishing more clout and more goodwill with each passing movie. That’s rare. Only certain brands really have that kind of following, where consumers really identify with a brand when they’re making they’re choice to go spend $15 on a movie ticket.”

There’s no question that the Marvel films under Disney all have a certain feel to them, which is impressive. At this point, I’d undoubtedly go see one even if I wasn’t familiar with the source material.

Adam Rogers on how Marvel was able to pull off the amazing feat of tying its films together, and how DC is unlikely going to be able to do the same:

DC declined to participate in this story, and representatives wouldn’t say who, if anyone, was overseeing the broader DC cinematic universe to come. The company has announced that after Snyder’s Batman-Superman movie, it’ll make one about the Flash, and then Justice League. The Flash is also slated to appear on the CW television series Arrow, though DC hasn’t said whether it’ll be the same version of character. And since Christian Bale has said he won’t play Batman again, the movie seems likely to be a reboot, especially because Snyder seems to be taking his inspiration from the dystopian future Batman comic The Dark Knight Returns, where a sixtysomething Batman comes out of retirement and ultimately fights Superman. That’s the kind of team-up that could make joining the Justice League together awkward.

They badly need their own Kevin Feige, and it seems unlikely that Zack Snyder will be the guy.

nerdology

nerdology:

dcu:

Superman/Batman 2015: What DailyDCU.com Would Do

Are you listening Warner Bros? Good. Here’s how to handle this story: Bruce Wayne (played by Christian Bale, and you pay him ALL the money to return) is having tea in Europe with Selena and Alfred. Bruce quickly becomes distracted by the television and the report on Superman and what just happened in Metropolis (basically the end of Man of Steel). Alfred says something like “You picked a good time to retire, looks like this bloke can handle any crimes you…” then, a grainy video from a phone shows Superman…SPOILER ALERT…break Zod’s neck. Bruce is stunned. He would never kill. The Dark Knight returns to stop this Man of Steel. What happens then? Special effects, misunderstandings, moral lessons, Nightwing, and Lex Luthor. Boom: Superman/Batman makes a billion plus dollars.

(STILL WAITING FOR CONFIRMATION THAT THIS MOVIE IS A REAL THING)

I must stand firmly with my friends at Daily DCU. They know what’s best.

Sounds pretty great to me. A way to salvage an otherwise ho-hum Man of Steel.

Though I highly doubt Bale would return - no matter the money. Hope I’m wrong.