#design

Andy Hertzfeld on Susan Kare:

One day, I came over to her cubicle to see what she was working on, and I was surprised to see her laboring over a tiny icon portrait of Steve Jobs.
Icons were only 32 by 32 black or white pixels, 1024 dots in total, and I didn’t think it was possible to do a very good portrait in that tiny a space, but somehow Susan had succeeded in crafting an instantly recognizable likeness with a mischevious grin that captured a lot of Steve’s personality. Everyone she showed it to liked it, even Steve himself.

Via Priceonomics’ in-depth look at Kare, definitely worth the read.

Andy Hertzfeld on Susan Kare:

One day, I came over to her cubicle to see what she was working on, and I was surprised to see her laboring over a tiny icon portrait of Steve Jobs.

Icons were only 32 by 32 black or white pixels, 1024 dots in total, and I didn’t think it was possible to do a very good portrait in that tiny a space, but somehow Susan had succeeded in crafting an instantly recognizable likeness with a mischevious grin that captured a lot of Steve’s personality. Everyone she showed it to liked it, even Steve himself.

Via Priceonomics’ in-depth look at Kare, definitely worth the read.

We don’t take so long and make the way we make for fiscal reasons. Quite the reverse. The body is made from a single piece of machined aluminium. The whole thing is polished first to a mirror finish and then is very finely textured, except for the Apple logo. The chamfers are cut with diamond-tipped cutters. The cutters don’t usually last very long, so we had to figure out a way of mass-manufacturing long-lasting ones. The camera cover is sapphire crystal. Look at the details around the sim-card slot. It’s extraordinary!
Jony Ive, describing his iPhone to John Arlidge.
Yes. I’d stop. I’d make things for myself, for my friends at home instead. The bar needs to be high. I don’t think that will happen. We are at the beginning of a remarkable time, when a remarkable number of products will be developed. When you think about technology and what it has enabled us to do so far, and what it will enable us to do in future, we’re not even close to any kind of limit. It’s still so, so new.
Jony Ive, when asked by John Arlidge if he would quit if he felt like Apple had lost a step.
Steve and I spent months and months working on a part of a product that, often, nobody would ever see, nor realize was there. It didn’t make any difference functionally. We did it because we cared, because when you realize how well you can make something, falling short, whether seen or not, feels like failure.
Jony Ive, talking about building Apple products with Steve Jobs during a long sit-down with John Arlidge.

I figured today would be an appropriate day to post some images from Iconic, the absolutely brilliant book of Apple product photography by Jonathan Zufi.

As so many reflect on the 30th anniversary of the Mac, this is the perfect way to look back at not only that product line, but all the different Apple product lines throughout the years.

So well done. Easily worth the price. It’s art.

Also be sure to check out the Celebrate the Mac site the team behind the book made yesterday.

youmeandmyapi

youmeandmyapi:

p-dpa:

Xerox Star 8010 Interfaces, high quality polaroids (1981)

The following are scans of high quality polaroid photographs of the screen of the Xerox Star 8010 workstation on its launch in 1981. Some of these photographs show earlier icon development.

The roots of pervasive iconography.

And the kids collectively ask, "what’s a document?"