#dropbox

Loom, Dropbox, And Space Travel

Loom CEO Jan Senderek, on the news that Dropbox has acquired his company:

We know this is a big deal. This decision was made with great care. We have worked hard on our product and feel that our vision aligns perfectly with Dropbox’s vision for Carousel. Dropbox has invested the past seven years focusing on building a secure home for your files. And now with Carousel comes a home for your photos and videos as well. We share the common goal of crafting a high quality product, always putting users’ needs first. After spending some serious time investigating if this was the right move for us, we realized that Dropbox has solved many problems around scaling infrastructure and at Dropbox the Loom team will be able to focus entirely on building great features with a fantastic user experience. We are enthusiastic about being able to contribute our ground level perspective to help craft a beautiful experience for our users. And at the end of the day, that’s what matters most to us.

It always reads like bullshit when an investor says that a deal is a great fit. But I’m gonna say it anyway. From their shared Y Combinator DNA to a shared product vision with the just-launched Carousel, Dropbox and Loom seem perfectly aligned. It’s always a bit bittersweet to see a startup sell before fulfilling the original vision they pitched, but in this case, Dropbox really will help them achieve that vision so much faster. 

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Team Mailbox:

Today, we’re proud to announce a new service built directly into Mailbox that learns from your swipes and snoozes to automate common actions. Mute that thread you don’t care about, snooze messages from your friends until after work, and route receipts to a list — automatically. We call this service Auto-swipe.

Auto-swipe is something we wanted to release with the first version of Mailbox, but it’s only with recent improvements to our infrastructure that such a smart service has been possible.

This really is something the team has talked about since the beginning. And it’s potentially very powerful — think: Gmail filters re-thought for mobile.

Also, Mailbox and Android is here today. And, perhaps most importantly, Mailbox for Mac is nearly ready for testing. If you’ve ever tried to use the OS X Mail app with Gmail, this will be the best news ever for you. One might call it “a glass of ice water in hell”.

I know some of you have been waiting for my thoughts on Dropbox acquiring Mailbox — my apologies, I’ve been sidetracked by SXSW SARS. I also realize I still need to write my longer thoughts about how Mailbox changed my email habits. For now, let me just congratulate the Mailbox team. They built something truly amazing and I could not be happier that the product will continue to live on and grow under the wings of Dropbox.
Many of you know how excited I’ve been about Mailbox over the past several months — and not just as an investor, but as a user. Email has been so broken for so long and these guys were the first ones really thinking outside the — sorry — box. So the success they’ve seen could not be any less surprising. I think Dropbox was very savvy to make this move and I think it seems like a great fit. Now get me a damn iPad client.

I know some of you have been waiting for my thoughts on Dropbox acquiring Mailbox — my apologies, I’ve been sidetracked by SXSW SARS. I also realize I still need to write my longer thoughts about how Mailbox changed my email habits. For now, let me just congratulate the Mailbox team. They built something truly amazing and I could not be happier that the product will continue to live on and grow under the wings of Dropbox.

Many of you know how excited I’ve been about Mailbox over the past several months — and not just as an investor, but as a user. Email has been so broken for so long and these guys were the first ones really thinking outside the — sorry — box. So the success they’ve seen could not be any less surprising. I think Dropbox was very savvy to make this move and I think it seems like a great fit. Now get me a damn iPad client.

Well, you’ve got to remember, 100 million sounds like a pretty small number to me, actually. We’ve got a lot more Office users. And actually if you even want to go to the cloud, we have a lot of Hotmail and SkyDrive users. I’m not beating on Dropbox. They’re a fine little startup and that’s great.

Steve Ballmer, speaking with Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance on the topic of Dropbox.

I often predict that a comment will come back to bite someone from Microsoft in the ass. But I can say with near certainty that this one will. I mean, what a monumentally stupid thing to say.

What’s the upside here? Goliath beating its chest? Does he think startups will cower at that? Why would they? It’s clear from this statement that Microsoft is either:

> a) arrogant and thus, ripe for disruption

> b) scared shitless of disruption

It’s not clear which is actually worse.

Amir Efrati reports that Google is close to launching a new product called “Drive”, a would-be Dropbox/Box/iCloud/etc competitor.

Before I left TechCrunch full time, I was hot on the trail of this project. Yes, Google had a Google Drive project that will killed off years ago, but a new one emerged last year and was being extensively used internally once again. 

Last I heard, this new Google Drive was said to be much better than the one that was killed off (which was killed off because many thought it “sucked”). It included a web component as well as Dropbox-like software piece that runs on your desktop. Mobile will be key as well, obviously. 

The most recent thing I heard supports what Efrati is reporting: that the prices are going to be more competitive than Dropbox.