#dvds

ninjafrog asked:

What's the problem with ripping DVDs? It takes me 20 minutes with handbrake on my iMac. Then I stream them to my jail broken aTV or my iOS device with an app "Air Video".

Yeah, regular users are never going to do that. Never. The solution needs to be similar to iTunes Match: put a DVD in a drive, connect to iTunes, pay $5 (or a monthly/yearly fee), get unlimited access to the HD digital version through iCloud.

Humorous that the biggest barrier to entry there may be the death of the optical disc drive.

rickwebb
rickwebb:

ben:

Easily collect your obsolete media for incineration. Why does it specify “Disney” Tapes

I had one of those in my soho apt. Bought it in 2008. It was called “The Colossus.” Left it on the sidewalk of Howard street in January 2012. It was picked up by someone within an hour. Weird. 

I remember seriously considering buying this. Not sure what I would use it for today. Moleskines?

rickwebb:

ben:

Easily collect your obsolete media for incineration. Why does it specify “Disney” Tapes

I had one of those in my soho apt. Bought it in 2008. It was called “The Colossus.” Left it on the sidewalk of Howard street in January 2012. It was picked up by someone within an hour. Weird. 

I remember seriously considering buying this. Not sure what I would use it for today. Moleskines?

Update: While McDermott accurately quoted the Netflix rep (who herself apparently checked with two supervisors), Netflix is now saying the information is inaccurate. Actually, The Bodyguard vanished as a streaming option before Houston’s passing.

Earlier: When asked why The Bodyguard was pulled from Netflix streaming following Whitney Houston’s death, Dan McDermott got the following response from a Netflix rep:

I just went and talked to my main supervisor as to why the movie had been pulled and the reason it was pulled was the production company pulled the streaming rights from us because all the publicity after Whitney Houston’s passing there was an opportunity to make really a very large amount of money on the DVD sales of her movies. So they’re going to pull all the streaming titles we have of Whitney Houston so they can make more money off the DVD sales of her movies.

What fucking scumbags. Not Netflix, which sadly has no control over situations like this, but the movie studio. 

It seems like Hollywood is eyeing two business models in order to preserve their precious DVD sales (which are tanking more each day):

1) Make it basically impossible to rent a film. It used to be that you could rent a movie the day it came out for sale on DVD. Then it was 30 days later. Now it’s 56 days later. And you can’t even think about renting the films for 28 days.

As a reminder, torrents currently have no such window.

2) Hope and pray that big time stars die to temporarily boost sales. And instead of doing everything in you power to ensure that fans have easy access to remember the stars they cherished, pull all access except for the most expensive and limited variety in order to maximize profits.

Get ready for this one — it’s huge. In fact, you better sit down.

You know the 28-day window* that studios now impose between when a DVD goes on sale and when it can be made available to rent?

It’s about to made 56 days, reports Peter Kafka.

Boom.

Hollywood is saved. DVD sales are going to flow like wine again. Everyone will be drunk. Glory days.

*sometimes known as “the bullshit 28-day window”

This was both inevitable and makes sense. While Netflix seems surprised by continued demand for DVDs, they also know that this will die over time. And whether they’ll admit it or not, this move will further help facilitate that demise.

The future is streaming, not physical media.

I do like how Netflix is very upfront and clear about the pricing changes. What was previously $9.99 (DVDs plus Streaming) will now be $15.98 (DVDs and Streaming as two separate plans).

That’s a big hike. But again, inevitable, and the right thing to do from a business perspective. 

Remember what I wrote last month about “The Hollow DVD Boost”? A refresher:

I’ve noted in all my posts that this greedy “30 day window” ploy was likely to cause a temporary bump in DVD sales. But the keyword is “temporary”. Just watch. They will start falling again.

Sure enough.

The silly 30-day window isn’t saving jack shit. It will lead to little boosts here and there for certain big films, but the overall sales will continue to tank.

The best part of this article though is that the movie studios are trying to blame poor Easter timing for the bad numbers.

Yep. That’s it.

Maybe next year they should also try delaying Easter by 30 days. 

John Marmaduke talking to CNET’s Greg Sandoval:

DVDs are still a $12 or $14 billion business. What people from the tech world often do is confuse themselves with the entire marketplace.

No, what people from the “tech world” do is give insight based on earlier adoption of new technology and forecast how things are going to play out.

I’ve noted in all my posts that this greedy “30 day window” ploy was likely to cause a temporary bump in DVD sales. But the keyword is “temporary”. Just watch. They will start falling again. And sooner than Hastings would like.

Creating demand based on false scarcity is not a sustainable business model.

And the real key here is that disruption is going to keep coming. At first it was Netflix’s mail model. Then it was Redbox $0.99 model. Then it was Netflix’s streaming model. And Apple, Amazon, etc, doing rentals over the web. There will be more of this in the years to come, not less.

And the fundamental point is that most movies simply are not worth owning. Preventing people from renting them will eventually either lead to more piracy or to them simply not watching the content and looking elsewhere for other content (like the web).

The studios and retail chains do not understand this. They really seem to think they can keep counting on their cash cow DVD sales indefinitely. It’s laughable.

Every technology is replaced by a new one. The problem they have is that the one replacing DVD isn’t as profitable for them because it leads to a different type of consumption. Or rather, it makes possible a different type of consumption that should have always been in play in the first place.

The DVD is dead, they just don’t realize it yet. In five years, they will look like what cassette tapes look like today when you walk into a store and see them.

Greedy ploys are nothing but a temporary stopgap. And the fact that the studios and retail giants don’t seem to understand that means they’re going to be burned very badly.