#film

newyorker
newyorker:

Anthony Lane reviews David Fincher’s “Gone Girl”:

“Why doesn’t the movie claw us as ‘The Social Network’ did? Who could have predicted that a film about murder, betrayal, and deception would be less exciting than a film about a Web site?”

Illustration by Owen Freeman / Twentieth Century Fox

Pretty much agree with all these thoughts about Gone Girl (and The Two Faces of January).

newyorker:

Anthony Lane reviews David Fincher’s “Gone Girl”:

“Why doesn’t the movie claw us as ‘The Social Network’ did? Who could have predicted that a film about murder, betrayal, and deception would be less exciting than a film about a Web site?”

Illustration by Owen Freeman / Twentieth Century Fox

Pretty much agree with all these thoughts about Gone Girl (and The Two Faces of January).

evangotlib

perzadook:

spytap:

People will say, “There are a million ways to shoot a scene”, but I don’t think so. I think there’re two, maybe. And the other one is wrong.”

David Fincher is perhaps the greatest living director - and I’m well aware of who I’m comparing him to by saying that. This video shows you why.

I have been on tumblr since 1989 and this is the boldest statement ever published on this site.

"And he’ll show us the inside of someone’s fridge."

Rob Dean:

Over on his excellent website, Extension 765, Soderbergh has uploaded a black-and-white version of the 1981 blockbuster in an effort to prompt cinephiliacs to think about how an impressive talent like Spielberg was able to convey so much of the story merely through length and composition of shots. He also removed all sound from the video, instead replacing it with Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ score for The Social Network, so that viewers can solely focus on the staging of the film.

So this is what “retirement" is like for Soderbergh. (The end result, which you can watch on Soderbergh’s site is beautiful and sort of mesmerizing.)