#food

Taffy Brodesser-Akner:

Besides, the Grill Sergeant told me, that incident — the one in which she referred to the man who allegedly robbed the bank where she worked as an N-word — was 25 years ago, in the 1960s. People used different words then. This is a thing I’d hear very often: that 25 years ago was in the 1960s, that it was a different time. Over and over, people on the boat — in the Deen group but also at large, who saw my lanyard identifying me as part of the Deen group — would bring up race and say what a different time it was 25 years ago in the 1960s. It was just at the dawn of the civil rights movement, after all. Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., all that. Actually, I’d point out, 25 years ago was just about 1990. For perspective, here’s what was going on in 1990: pregnant women knew not to smoke; Beverly Hills, 90210, was on; the Internet existed. 1990 was pretty recent, in fact.

The entire piece is equal parts hilarious and terrifying.

Rob Brunner:

Another way Bourdain stays engaged is by constantly experimenting with technology. As equipment has improved over the years, the show has become more visually accomplished. In addition to high-end cameras like $16,000 Sony F3s with cinema-quality lenses and more modest equipment such as Canon 7Ds, the team now regularly uses GoPros, often in unexpected ways. In the Shanghai episode, they rigged up what they refer to as “shot cam,” a GoPro attached to a shot glass that captures, to dizzying effect, the liquor’s-eye view during a night of revelry. They have used bags of risotto for makeshift tracking shots (“risotto cam”) and turned a Hot Wheels track into a camera dolly. Bourdain is especially excited about the possibility of shooting an upcoming show entirely on iPhones.

The “shot cam” is genius. The iPhone thing should be very much possible with the iPhone 6/6+.

Also love this:

Bourdain now has a term for such corporate meddling: being asked to “eat a shit sandwich.” It’s one of the few meals he flat-out refuses to consume. “Given a choice between eating the sandwich and not having a television career, I would happily not have a television career,” he says. “Most people eat the sandwich.” He quit, taking the show to Travel Channel.

Most people definitely eat the sandwich.

Buster Hein on Steve Jobs’ love of sushi — and one place in Japan, in particular:

Before Jobs died in October 2011 he made one last hire – Toshi Sakuma. With the fast-paced lifestyle weighing on him, Sakuma decided to sell the restaurant. Unable to find a quick buyer, Jobs offered Sakuma a job at Caffè Mac where Apple employees can still go to enjoy the sushi Jobs loved for a quarter century.

The restaurant was set to close on October 7th, and according to Nobi, Jony Ive’s secretary scheduled a reservation and mentioned a special guest (presumed to be Jobs) would be joining. A cancellation soon followed when news of Jobs’ death broke.

Kaygetsu’s last day of business was the same day as Steve’s funeral.

Sad.

Patrick J. Kiger on Lynsi Snyder, the 31-year-old president of In-N-Out:

And indeed, while Snyder has walked through darkness a few too many times for a woman seemingly born to a life of privilege, her fearless, thrill-loving race car driver side is balanced by an oddly incongruous caution when it comes to running the company she inherited.

“In the business world, I’m much more conservative, much more old-fashioned,” she says. “I’m not as much into taking risk. … On those personality tests, I come out as a choleric-sanguine, a combination of opposites: an organized, careful leader, but also fun-loving and free-spirited.”

Snyder’s conservative, risk-averse side, though, is a good fit for In‑N‑Out Burger, which has two core principles: 1) Don’t change anything, and 2) Concentrate on doing the same things you’ve always done, as well as humanly possible.

In other words, focus on what works.

newyorker
newyorker:

Hostess Brands re-launched the Twinkie on Monday with a recipe that manages to nearly double the product’s shelf life. However, the company is cutting down in other ways: calories, product size, and its workforce—from 19,000 jobs in November to as few as 1,800: http://nyr.kr/13jq1wt
Illustration by Larry Buchanan.

Doubling-down on Twinkies in just about every way possible — except for the size of the workforce creating these culinary works of wonder. 

newyorker:

Hostess Brands re-launched the Twinkie on Monday with a recipe that manages to nearly double the product’s shelf life. However, the company is cutting down in other ways: calories, product size, and its workforce—from 19,000 jobs in November to as few as 1,800: http://nyr.kr/13jq1wt

Illustration by Larry Buchanan.

Doubling-down on Twinkies in just about every way possible — except for the size of the workforce creating these culinary works of wonder.