#food

Patrick J. Kiger on Lynsi Snyder, the 31-year-old president of In-N-Out:

And indeed, while Snyder has walked through darkness a few too many times for a woman seemingly born to a life of privilege, her fearless, thrill-loving race car driver side is balanced by an oddly incongruous caution when it comes to running the company she inherited.

“In the business world, I’m much more conservative, much more old-fashioned,” she says. “I’m not as much into taking risk. … On those personality tests, I come out as a choleric-sanguine, a combination of opposites: an organized, careful leader, but also fun-loving and free-spirited.”

Snyder’s conservative, risk-averse side, though, is a good fit for In‑N‑Out Burger, which has two core principles: 1) Don’t change anything, and 2) Concentrate on doing the same things you’ve always done, as well as humanly possible.

In other words, focus on what works.

newyorker
newyorker:

Hostess Brands re-launched the Twinkie on Monday with a recipe that manages to nearly double the product’s shelf life. However, the company is cutting down in other ways: calories, product size, and its workforce—from 19,000 jobs in November to as few as 1,800: http://nyr.kr/13jq1wt
Illustration by Larry Buchanan.

Doubling-down on Twinkies in just about every way possible — except for the size of the workforce creating these culinary works of wonder. 

newyorker:

Hostess Brands re-launched the Twinkie on Monday with a recipe that manages to nearly double the product’s shelf life. However, the company is cutting down in other ways: calories, product size, and its workforce—from 19,000 jobs in November to as few as 1,800: http://nyr.kr/13jq1wt

Illustration by Larry Buchanan.

Doubling-down on Twinkies in just about every way possible — except for the size of the workforce creating these culinary works of wonder. 

shortformblog
shortformblog:

Before email existed in your inbox, an Australian manufacturing giant better known for making refrigerators and other household appliances had a monopoly on the name. It was a simpler time, when checking your email meant leftovers were always within reach, rather than merely spam. Obviously, that now-defunct company’s name ranks high in the SEO ranks these days. (via the Voices of East Anglia Facebook page)

My parallel universe nightmare lives!

shortformblog:

Before email existed in your inbox, an Australian manufacturing giant better known for making refrigerators and other household appliances had a monopoly on the name. It was a simpler time, when checking your email meant leftovers were always within reach, rather than merely spam. Obviously, that now-defunct company’s name ranks high in the SEO ranks these days. (via the Voices of East Anglia Facebook page)

My parallel universe nightmare lives!

Foursquare:

Instead of other sites where every place gets 3.5 stars, we come up with our scores using the same Foursquare magic that powers Explore. We look at signals like tips, likes, dislikes, popularity, loyalty, local expertise, and nearly 3 billion check-ins from over 25 million people worldwide. And, with every check-in and Explore search, our scores will get smarter and better.

A-fucking-men. 1 to 5 stars is and always has been pure shit. 1 star (bad) and 5 stars (great) makes sense. Maybe even 3 stars (okay). But what the hell are 2 and 4 stars? It’s different for everyone. And the majority of people doing the rating are usually only going to do so if they hate or love something. It’s such a better idea to use other, implicit signals.