#google

Steven Levy interviewed Ray Kurzweil about his new role at Google. On the topic of having the courage to follow your convictions:

Levy: What’s the biological basis for that kind of courage? If you had an infinite ability to analyze a brain, could you say, “Oh, here’s where the courage is?”

Kurzweil: It is the neocortex, and people who fill up too much of their neocortex with concern about the approval of their peers are probably not going be the next Einstein or Steve Jobs.

Tero Kuittinen of BGR:

It is hard not to admire Sanjay Jha’s cool genius in handling Motorola’s sale to Google. He leveraged Motorola’s old sales contacts in Asia and Latin America to push nondescript models into sales channel, creating an illusion of international traction during 2010 and early 2011. He created a shadow play of a healthy AT&T relationship, feeding expectations of substantial sales growth for Motorola’s business in the United States. For a brief time, Motorola seemed like a company in healthy shape.

Then Google announced its intent to buy Motorola in the summer of 2011 and the glamor flaked off like glitter lipstick from a Chicago prostitute in dawn’s cold light.

Eric Schmidt, speaking with Alan Rusbridger of The Guardian:

"There’s a lot of discussion in the world about the two billion that are connected," he says. "We spend all day talking about the issues of e-commerce and start-ups and globalisation and so forth, and we forget that the majority of people are not online and that they will come online, the majority of them in the next five years.

It’s going to happen very fast. It’s going to happen in countries which don’t have the same principles that we in America have from the British legal system – around law and privacy and those sorts of things. All sorts of crazy stuff is going to happen. Human societies can’t change that fast without both good and negative implications.”

Such a great logo.
Oh, and a good post by Anthony Crupi for AdWeek: Legacy Cable Operators in Austin Are Terrified of Google Fiber.
Crupi:

On paper, literally everything about Google Fiber makes standard digital-cable service look like something that was cobbled together by members of a lesser phylum. Boasting gigabit download/upload speeds (up to 1,000 Megabits per second), Google’s connectivity is roughly 70 times faster than Time Warner Cable’s standard 15 Mbps plan. 

The incumbents are scared shitless. And rightfully so. For far too long they’ve coasted on their over-priced crap services.

Such a great logo.

Oh, and a good post by Anthony Crupi for AdWeek: Legacy Cable Operators in Austin Are Terrified of Google Fiber.

Crupi:

On paper, literally everything about Google Fiber makes standard digital-cable service look like something that was cobbled together by members of a lesser phylum. Boasting gigabit download/upload speeds (up to 1,000 Megabits per second), Google’s connectivity is roughly 70 times faster than Time Warner Cable’s standard 15 Mbps plan. 

The incumbents are scared shitless. And rightfully so. For far too long they’ve coasted on their over-priced crap services.

Michael Liedtke for the AP:

Microsoft has tried to thwart Google by investing heavily in online services, to little avail. Since Google went public in August 2004, Microsoft’s online division has accumulated more than $17.5 billion in operating losses. The losses include an accounting charge of more than $6 billion for Microsoft’s acquisition of aQuantive, an online advertising service that didn’t pan out.

And:

Google’s market value has soared from nearly $25 billion at the time of its initial public offering to $255 billion. Microsoft’s market value has fallen by about 20 percent during the same period, declining from nearly $300 billion at the time of Google’s IPO to $239 billion today. Apple Inc., a rival of both Google and Microsoft, is the only technology company worth more than Google, with a market value hovering around $400 billion.

In other words, Microsoft’s online division has lost almost as much money as all of Google was worth at the time of its IPO. That is truly remarkable.

Stacey Higginbotham for GigaOm: 

And that’s one of the biggest repercussions of Google’s fiber roll outs. The more people who can pay $70 for gigabit service (or get 5 Mbps for free), the more pressure this puts on the existing providers to upgrade their networks and cut anticonsumer crap like data caps. But that’s exactly why more cities need these networks.

Google is very good at the do-something-to-pressure-others-to-do-it maneuver — which I appreciate.