#high speed trains

Keith Bradsher:

Just five years after China’s high-speed rail system opened, it is carrying nearly twice as many passengers each month as the country’s domestic airline industry. With traffic growing 28 percent a year for the last several years, China’s high-speed rail network will handle more passengers by early next year than the 54 million people a month who board domestic flights in the United States.

Surprise: if you build it, they will come. Wouldn’t it be great if the United States could figure this out?

caterpillarcowboy
caterpillarcowboy:

(via World’s Longest High-Speed Rail Line Opens in China - NYTimes.com)
HONG KONG — China began service Wednesday morning on the world’s longest high-speed rail line, covering a distance in eight hours that is about equal to that from New York to Key West, Florida, or from London across Europe to Belgrade.
Bullet trains traveling 300 kilometers an hour, or 186 miles an hour, began regular service between Beijing and Guangzhou, the main metropolis in southeastern China. Older trains still in service on a parallel rail line take 21 hours; Amtrak trains from New York to Miami, a shorter distance, still take nearly 30 hours.

I really, really wish the United States would get on board with the high speed rail movement. Alas, I fear it would make too much sense so it will never happen.

caterpillarcowboy:

(via World’s Longest High-Speed Rail Line Opens in China - NYTimes.com)

HONG KONG — China began service Wednesday morning on the world’s longest high-speed rail line, covering a distance in eight hours that is about equal to that from New York to Key West, Florida, or from London across Europe to Belgrade.

Bullet trains traveling 300 kilometers an hour, or 186 miles an hour, began regular service between Beijing and Guangzhou, the main metropolis in southeastern China. Older trains still in service on a parallel rail line take 21 hours; Amtrak trains from New York to Miami, a shorter distance, still take nearly 30 hours.

I really, really wish the United States would get on board with the high speed rail movement. Alas, I fear it would make too much sense so it will never happen.