#instapaper

dbreunig
dbreunig:


So good.
Update: If I were Instapaper I’d be recording app usage information, especially length of reading session, start time reading, and location. Using these, I’d build types of reading moments: morning commute, lunchtime, waiting for a flight, before bed… Each of these would be mapped to moments in your day when I expect them to occur, and for how long.
Then, I’d build a feature which could proactively buzz users at times and locations where I expect reading to occur, with a piece just the right length for the moment.


Yeah, great feature (and good suggestion).

dbreunig:

So good.

Update: If I were Instapaper I’d be recording app usage information, especially length of reading session, start time reading, and location. Using these, I’d build types of reading moments: morning commute, lunchtime, waiting for a flight, before bed… Each of these would be mapped to moments in your day when I expect them to occur, and for how long.

Then, I’d build a feature which could proactively buzz users at times and locations where I expect reading to occur, with a piece just the right length for the moment.

Yeah, great feature (and good suggestion).

As a culture we have moved into a realm where the consumption of news is a near-constant process. Users with smartphones and tablets are consuming news in bits and bites throughout the course of the day — replacing the old standard behaviors of news consumption over breakfast along with a leisurely read at the end of the day.

Richard Gringras, Senior Director of News & Social Products at Google, talking to Wired about why they decided to kill off Google Reader.

In my own case, this is absolutely accurate. I used to sit in front of Google Reader all day, every day. Then Twitter came along and I just stopped doing that. Most of the news I consume now gets pushed to me from Techmeme or a few other sources via Twitter on my various iOS devices.

I also get a ton of value out of things like Flipboard (which I do read “leisurely” in the morning) and services like Pocket and Instapaper.

In a way, this reminds me of the cable television situation. I have moved from a bundled approach where I get everything from every source dumped in my lap to a à la carte approach, where I choose what I want.

The next evolution of this will be the Google Now approach Gringras hits upon. But I think that will be pretty complicated to get right.

Marco Arment:

I’m happy to announce that I’ve sold a majority stake in Instapaper to Betaworks. We’ve structured the deal with Instapaper’s health and longevity as the top priority, with incentives to keep it going well into the future. I will continue advising the project indefinitely, while Betaworks will take over its operations, expand its staff, and develop it further.

A seemingly perfect fit for the product going forward. Huge congrats to Marco.

Hunter Walk:

So let’s say instead of trying to ‘create a consistent experience,’ Twitter charged users $10/yr to use 3rd party clients. The idea being when you try to auth against a client, Twitter checks to see whether you’re activated for offsite tweeting. You can’t compose messages, RT or receive/send DMs without authing in, and a 3rd party client that lacks the ability to send Tweets likely wouldn’t gain much traction, so don’t worry about their read access of the API.

This is not unlike what Instapaper does. If you’re a paying customer, you get to authorize your own API access for third-party clients/services. It’s smart, but I’m not sure it would be smart for Twitter. I suspect the revenue generated would not outweigh their core desire for more control over the entire experience.

I think they would view it as chopping off an arm to make a headache go away.

Great, honest post by Marco Arment from last week (just catching up on reading now in my post-SXSW haze). He’s reacting to the recent launch of Readability’s new app which is competitive with Arment’s own Instapaper

Writes Arment:

Reacting well to competition requires critical analysis of your own product and its shortcomings, and a complete, open-minded understanding of why people might choose your competitors.

How often do you see someone admit that they screwed up in the face of competition? Not often. It’s usually lame excuses or flat-out denial.

No product is perfect. And if you really can’t believe and/or admit when your competition does something better than you, you’re already on the road to failure.

Great new app by the Longform guys. They auto-stock and auto-curate longer form articles from various publications for you to read on your iPad (optionally using Readability to remove the clutter). 

I’m a big fan of services like Instapaper and Read It Later, but I recognize that plenty of people don’t want to take the time to go out and find their own content to read later (though those services have their own way of surfacing curated content as well). This is a nice alternative that fulfills Longform’s mission of surfacing comprehensive journalism. And, of course, it works with Instapaper and Read It Later too. 

The app is $4.99 in the App Store. 

Instapaper has been a staple of my daily routine for years now. Today brings version 4.0, which offers huge improvements both visually and in terms of functionality. I’ve been beta testing the app for a few weeks — it’s an excellent update. Creator Marco Arment talks about it in detail here.

The app is $4.99 (if you’re updating, it’s free) — well worth it — and comes with a new $2.99 subscription-based search option. Yes, you can finally search the content of each article you save, including the ones you archive. You also get access to search if you’re a subscriber (I’ve been a happily paying member for months). 

Love some of the innovative ways Marco is thinking about making money. Also, the new icon is a huge upgrade. Download it for that, stay for the awesome app.