#ios

Tim forwarded your email to me. We agree with you. Our emoji characters are based on the Unicode standard, which is necessary for them to be displayed properly across many platforms. There needs to be more diversity in the emoji character set, and we have been working closely with the Unicode Consortium in an effort to update the standard.
Apple’s head of communications, Katie Cotton, responding to MTV about the lack of diversity in the iOS emoji set.

ericmortensen asked:

Do you think Apple is providing the touch screens, wiring harnesses, etc. for CarPlay? I can't imagine they'd leave something like the touch experience or screen resolution to a car manufacturer. I have a hard time believing this is just a software solution.

It’s a good question — it seems that no, they’re not. As you can see here, companies like Mercedes are not only leaving these screens open for use with their own systems, they’re also leaving them open to Android in the future (though details aren’t clear there).

All of this sort of led to my reference to the Rokr. We’ll see how well Apple likes playing on other’s hardware. They do it a bit with the Apple TV, but as you note, this is someone else’s touchscreen. 

Some Thoughts On Facebook Paper

I’ve been trying out Facebook’s latest app, Paper1, all day and thought I’d post some initial thoughts.

1) It’s very well done. Some of the design seems a bit heavy-handed at times, but it’s responsive and sleek.

2) I’ve already replaced the standard Facebook app on my phone with Paper. It has basically everything you need from Facebook except Events, which you have to assume is another one of the stand-alone apps they’re working on.

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Simpler Games, Simpler Times

Flappy Bird. Flappy. Fucking. Bird.

About a week ago, I was perusing the App Store as I normally do. Much to my surprise, I saw a new king atop the free app charts: Flappy Bird. This was odd to me because I usually feel like I’m paying enough attention to see an app’s rise in one way or another. But not here. The app seemingly rose from 0 to 60 overnight.

Even crazier: the same developer now controls three of the top ten spaces in the App Store with Flappy Bird at number one, Super Ball Juggling at number two, and Shuriken Block at number nine.

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Cards For Humanity

The other night I was playing the iOS game Evil Apples. It’s a fairly well-done and clever take on Cards Against Humanity that seems to be doing quite well in the App Store. But it’s not Cards Against Humanity. And it will never be Cards Against Humanity. It’s missing one key ingredient: humanity.

On the surface, that game has all the two elements it needs to emulate Cards Against Humanity: seemingly innocuous sentences missing a word or phrase and absolutely filthy words/phrases. But it’s only when playing Evil Apples that you realize how vital the face-to-face component of the game is.

Cards Against Humanity is not great because of its novelty — it’s really just a spin on Apples to Apples. It’s great because of what it does to people playing it together in the same room. It’s one of the most unique bonding experiences I’ve ever witnessed.

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From Matthew Panzarino’s story on the launch:

Offline differs from many other magazines on iOS in a couple of very important ways. First of all, it offers both text versions of stories and professionally produced audio that you can listen to at any point in an article. And it also boasts a unique cost structure that the team hopes will allow it to pay 2-3x what normal freelance writers see for contributions.

The audio integration is brilliant. I actually already listen to a lot of content on my iPhone/iPad but do it using a sort of hack: the speak selection accessibility feature — but that’s essentially Siri reading to you, this is professional voice actors. 

And, of course, I support any publication trying to find new ways to pay writers well.