#ios

Jean-Louis Gassée’s takeaway from WWDC and the unveiling of iOS 8:

This is the real iOS 2.0. For developers, after the 2008 momentous opening of the App Store that redefined the smartphone, this is the second major release.

It’s one of those things where on the surface, iOS 8 won’t look much different from iOS 7. But underneath, not only are there a massive amount of new APIs, there’s a real shift in the the core concepts that drive the OS.

Scotty Loveless:

One thing I found in my Genius Bar experience is that people that are anxious about their iOS device battery life are constantly checking it to see the percentage and how much it has dropped from the last time they checked it. So if you check your device twice as much, simply to check on the battery life, you are essentially halving the time your device will last.

Stop freaking out and enjoy your life. There are more important things to worry about than your device’s battery life. The control freak inside you might freak out the first few days you do this, but you’ll get used to it.

I’m a much happier person since I turned off the battery percentage indicator. Also, it looks like iOS 8 is going to go a long way towards alleviating the (major) battery woes of iOS 7 — but these are all still great tips.

Kyle Vanhemert:

After all of that work, it took some other developers all of an afternoon, give or take a few afternoons, to rip Threes off. One of those derivative games, 2048, all but eclipsed Threes, even though it borrowed only the superficial joys of the original while ignoring much of what makes it truly great.

I was also guilty of touting 2048, without realizing the error. Which sucks, but:

Threes transformed dramatically over the year that followed, in a collaboration that transpired mostly in emails between Vollmer and Wohlwend. The saga is available for anyone to follow. Last month, as the duo were figuring out what to do about the 2048 problem, they decided to “show their work,” giving the world an intimate look into the making of their game. It takes the form of The Threes Letters, a compendium of correspondence comprising some 40,000 words in hundreds of emails. It’s like the WikiLeaks of game design–a document dump that offers a fascinating peek behind the curtain.

Great read (and great game) all-around.

Tim forwarded your email to me. We agree with you. Our emoji characters are based on the Unicode standard, which is necessary for them to be displayed properly across many platforms. There needs to be more diversity in the emoji character set, and we have been working closely with the Unicode Consortium in an effort to update the standard.
Apple’s head of communications, Katie Cotton, responding to MTV about the lack of diversity in the iOS emoji set.

ericmortensen asked:

Do you think Apple is providing the touch screens, wiring harnesses, etc. for CarPlay? I can't imagine they'd leave something like the touch experience or screen resolution to a car manufacturer. I have a hard time believing this is just a software solution.

It’s a good question — it seems that no, they’re not. As you can see here, companies like Mercedes are not only leaving these screens open for use with their own systems, they’re also leaving them open to Android in the future (though details aren’t clear there).

All of this sort of led to my reference to the Rokr. We’ll see how well Apple likes playing on other’s hardware. They do it a bit with the Apple TV, but as you note, this is someone else’s touchscreen. 

Some Thoughts On Facebook Paper

I’ve been trying out Facebook’s latest app, Paper1, all day and thought I’d post some initial thoughts.

1) It’s very well done. Some of the design seems a bit heavy-handed at times, but it’s responsive and sleek.

2) I’ve already replaced the standard Facebook app on my phone with Paper. It has basically everything you need from Facebook except Events, which you have to assume is another one of the stand-alone apps they’re working on.

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Simpler Games, Simpler Times

Flappy Bird. Flappy. Fucking. Bird.

About a week ago, I was perusing the App Store as I normally do. Much to my surprise, I saw a new king atop the free app charts: Flappy Bird. This was odd to me because I usually feel like I’m paying enough attention to see an app’s rise in one way or another. But not here. The app seemingly rose from 0 to 60 overnight.

Even crazier: the same developer now controls three of the top ten spaces in the App Store with Flappy Bird at number one, Super Ball Juggling at number two, and Shuriken Block at number nine.

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Cards For Humanity

The other night I was playing the iOS game Evil Apples. It’s a fairly well-done and clever take on Cards Against Humanity that seems to be doing quite well in the App Store. But it’s not Cards Against Humanity. And it will never be Cards Against Humanity. It’s missing one key ingredient: humanity.

On the surface, that game has all the two elements it needs to emulate Cards Against Humanity: seemingly innocuous sentences missing a word or phrase and absolutely filthy words/phrases. But it’s only when playing Evil Apples that you realize how vital the face-to-face component of the game is.

Cards Against Humanity is not great because of its novelty — it’s really just a spin on Apples to Apples. It’s great because of what it does to people playing it together in the same room. It’s one of the most unique bonding experiences I’ve ever witnessed.

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