#ios

Cards For Humanity

The other night I was playing the iOS game Evil Apples. It’s a fairly well-done and clever take on Cards Against Humanity that seems to be doing quite well in the App Store. But it’s not Cards Against Humanity. And it will never be Cards Against Humanity. It’s missing one key ingredient: humanity.

On the surface, that game has all the two elements it needs to emulate Cards Against Humanity: seemingly innocuous sentences missing a word or phrase and absolutely filthy words/phrases. But it’s only when playing Evil Apples that you realize how vital the face-to-face component of the game is.

Cards Against Humanity is not great because of its novelty — it’s really just a spin on Apples to Apples. It’s great because of what it does to people playing it together in the same room. It’s one of the most unique bonding experiences I’ve ever witnessed.

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From Matthew Panzarino’s story on the launch:

Offline differs from many other magazines on iOS in a couple of very important ways. First of all, it offers both text versions of stories and professionally produced audio that you can listen to at any point in an article. And it also boasts a unique cost structure that the team hopes will allow it to pay 2-3x what normal freelance writers see for contributions.

The audio integration is brilliant. I actually already listen to a lot of content on my iPhone/iPad but do it using a sort of hack: the speak selection accessibility feature — but that’s essentially Siri reading to you, this is professional voice actors. 

And, of course, I support any publication trying to find new ways to pay writers well.

Eric Johnson:

Google’s mobile augmented-reality game Ingress, which has found a small but passionate audience on Android, is also coming to Apple’s mobile operating system, iOS, but not until next year.

Ingress product manager Brandon Badger confirmed the iOS plans in an interview yesterday with AllThingsD. The game launched into closed beta last November, and so far has racked up about one million activations, with hundreds of thousands of active players every month on Android phones.

We’ve been dancing around “augmented reality” gaming for a long time now. Ingress may just be the thing that makes it tip.

Josh Lowensohn:

Alongside iOS 7’s arrival today, Apple has quietly doubled the size of apps users can download while away from Wi-Fi. That cap is now 100MB, up from the 50MB Apple instituted last March. Before that, the limit was 20MB, something developers began running into problems with as they tried to fit in artwork and other elements into apps that would work on the iPhone and iPad, as well as Retina and non-Retina Display devices. Some developers attempted to get around the issue, designing games to download things like additional levels and content once a user had already installed the software. Beyond apps, the larger size also affects other types of media from the App Store or iTunes, like videos, books, and music.

Bigger news than it may seem like at first. You’d be surprised how many developers have had to cut things in their apps just to be able to get below the previous 50MB limit. 

Matthew Panzarino on Apple’s new ‘App Resurrection’ feature that allows users on older builds of iOS to download older builds of apps that will work on their devices:

But there is also no way for developers to re-upload old versions of the apps with those issues fixed. Simply put, a user on an old version of iOS could download an app with issues that are impossible for a developer to ever fix. You can see the nightmare scenario that is cropping up in many developer’s minds here.

It really is great on one hand and shitty on the other.

Update: Apple has addressed the issue by giving the developers the option to opt-out of such functionality. Nice to see them move so quickly on this.