#ipad

John Gruber, ripping apart this piece by Joe Nocera:

The iPad was “just a big iPhone” when it was unveiled in 2010; today it’s hailed as Apple’s last great new product. My guess is we’ll see the same reaction to whatever Apple releases this year. It takes years for even the most amazing of new products — the iPhone, for example — to prove themselves on the market. It’s a long game.

Even then — come, say, 2017, when Apple is reaping billions in profits from some product first introduced this year — the doomed-without-Jobs crowd could (and I bet will) just argue that the product succeeded only because it had been conceived while Steve Jobs was alive. It’ll never stop.

A fun exercise would be to write Apple critiques years in advance and see just how close they are when the stories hit in the future. I bet they’d be pretty close. It’s like paint-by-numbers for the tech press.

Jason Snell:

In other words, in four years the wearables market might grow to be one-tenth the size of today’s smartphone market—in units shipped. Presumably the average selling price of wearable items will be a fraction of that of smartphones, meaning the dollar value of the wearables market is even more minuscule compared to the smartphone market.

All of which means that wearables, while dramatic and exciting and with huge potential to change people’s lives, are never going to rival smartphones in terms of market size. Same goes for smart TV boxes. These are interesting, fun areas of technological change. But the smartphone—that boring old Internet-connected 64-bit supercomputer in your pocket that just keeps improving year after year—is going to be the big dog in the tech world for years to come. Apple’s future success or failure will be dependent on the iPhone, and to a lesser extent the iPad, not on a smartwatch.

That’s exactly right. I’ve been saying this for a while: there is no industry, save maybe the oil business, that could yield the type of profits Apple is used to with the iPhone. And that points to a lot of disappointment in the eyes of Wall Street no matter what comes — unless Apple buys Exxon.

blogoculaire asked:

What is the percentage of time you use your iPad(s)/iPhone versus PC/MacBook(s). Can you make it to 100% soon?

I’d say it’s probably 70/30 on iDevices vs. MacBook. Most of the MacBook Air time is work-related. And that figure is so heavily tilted in the iDevices favor because I use the iPhone far more than any other device.

That said, when it comes to “general computing”, I much prefer to use the iPad Air (with the Logitech keyboard) for almost everything. But I suspect a rumored 12” Retina MacBook Air could tilt the numbers back in the MacBook favor, if only temporarily.

Ina Fried:

Indeed, Microsoft does offer Office 365 subscriptions within the just-released Word for iPad and the other Office apps and, yes, it is paying the 30 percent cut, Apple confirmed to Re/code. Microsoft declined to comment on the matter.

Microsoft is giving Apple a 30 percent cut on sales of Office 365 through the iPad apps. Let that sink in for a minute. And then realize that both sides are probably going to make a ton of money as a result.

52 Days

A few tweets of mine today about Microsoft releasing Office for iPad seem to have people up-in-arms. So allow me to clarify.

First, I do think this is an important moment. Not for me, personally, because I still won’t use Office — haven’t in years — but for millions of other people who do and want to use it on their own terms, on their own devices. More importantly, this is important for Microsoft. It’s a grand gesture to suggest they’re finally taking their head out of the sand it has been in for the better part of a decade.

"But, but, but, Microsoft clearly didn’t make Office in 52 days!," they whine. No shit. I’m not saying that Satya Nadella has been the one man hand-coding Office for iPad with both hands tied behind his back for the past 52 days. I’m saying it takes balls for Microsoft to even release Office for iPad at all. Especially now.

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The iPhone Company

It’s Apple earnings day which means two things:

1) Wall Street freaking out amidst record numbers.

2) Lots of people on Twitter linking to lots of different charts trying to explain Apple’s quarter.

I’m pretty sure we’ve reached peak chart.

The issue is that the only real things these charts show at this point is that Apple is both a habitual company and a money-making machine. And, to some extent, they prove the law of large numbers. The charts aren’t going up-and-to-the-right as fast as they used to because well, there are only so many people in the world who can buy Apple products.

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Anonymous asked:

I'm in the same place you are with my iPad Air (I really like the Logitech Fabricskin keyboard myself). My stumbling block is the need to refer to notes or other research material (a pdf, an article, etc.) while writing. I have gotten used to having them open and on the same screen at the same time, which is far less distracting than switching back and forth on a tablet. How are you overcoming this limitation?

Understood. The solution for me has simply been fast app switching. It’s not as fast, as screen-swiping on OS X (or having two documents open at the same time, of course), but the four-finger gestures for iOS work pretty well. Hopefully future iOS versions will address this further.

Habits & Tablets

As previously noted, I’m very close to being able to go with the iPad as my main computing device. Yes, as someone who writes quite a bit (both email and posts like this one), I prefer a physical keyboard — but I found one for the iPad that I quite love: the Logitech variety.1 So there must be something else holding me back.

One thing is specialized VPN access to certain things I need for work. But I suspect that sooner rather than later, that will be resolved. So what else holds me back? Well, habit.

While the physical keyboard aspect gets most of the attention2, I actually believe the tendencies many of us have formed using PCs these past 20 to 30 years are just as important when considering what is holding us back from entering the tablet-only world.

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Claire Cain Miller:

At 76, David Hockney, the British artist known for bold colors and landscapes, remains an early adopter of technology. His iPad drawings are included in “David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition” at the de Young Museum, in San Francisco through Jan. 20.

Mr. Hockney uses the Brushes app, a stylus and a digital inkjet printer that takes 20 minutes to print each large page. He’s known for drawing and painting outdoors, and the iPad has simplified that process. It has also raised questions among critics about whether iPad drawings qualify as art.

Why on Earth wouldn’t it qualify as art? Because it’s digital? In a few years such critics will look like buffoons. I saw the Hockney exhibit a few months ago, it’s absolutely brilliant. It’s art.

Brooks Barnes on companies like DreamWorks working with partners on their own tablets:

Entertainment companies have been surprised at how speedily children have taken to tablets, sometimes forgoing TV sets altogether. As a result, DreamWorks, Disney and their competitors are searching for ways to make it easier for users to find their characters on portable devices.

It’s a smart thing to try, but:

The DreamTab is not a toy. Switched into parent mode, it provides roughly the same computing power as an iPad, the companies said.

This seems like a mistake. “Roughly”? I bet it’s nowhere near as powerful at those price points. And people, be they children or adults, will not be fooled. I think they should pick one market and go after it. This is not going to compete with the iPad as an all-around tablet.