#iphone 5

Craig Mod:

After two and a half years, the GF1 was replaced by the slightly improved Panasonic GX1, which I brought on the six-day Kumano Kodo hike in October. During the trip, I alternated between shooting with it and an iPhone 5. After importing the results into Lightroom, Adobe’s photo-development software, it was difficult to distinguish the GX1’s photos from the iPhone 5’s. (That’s not even the latest iPhone; Austin Mann’s superlative results make it clear that the iPhone 5S operates on an even higher level.) Of course, zooming in and poking around the photos revealed differences: the iPhone 5 doesn’t capture as much highlight detail as the GX1, or handle low light as well, or withstand intense editing, such as drastic changes in exposure. But it seems clear that in a couple of years, with an iPhone 6S in our pockets, it will be nearly impossible to justify taking a dedicated camera on trips like the Kumano Kodo pilgrimage.

I know a lot of people hate this reality. But it is going to be a reality.

Steve Kovach of Business Insider did the math on T-Mobile’s new “un-carrier" plan for the iPhone:

Now compare that to the $2,020 two-year cost of owning an iPhone 5 on T-Mobile. You’re saving $580 in most cases. (Sprint comes close with its 450 minute plan, but keep in mind you still get unlimited minutes with T-Mobile. If you talk a lot on your phone, you’re still getting a better deal with T-Mobile.)

He takes into account not only the cost of the phone (after T-Mobile’s non-subsidy subsidy) but the cost of the plans as well. It’s not exactly cheap, but T-Mobile is the clear winner here from a pricing perspective. From a coverage perspective, that’s another matter…

Want #2 this morning. The Mophie Juice Pack Helium is apparently 13 percent thinner than the Mophie Air version that was popular for the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S (you’d hope so, with more back surface area on the iPhone 5 meaning more battery space). And it should give you a full battery charge.

Since the launch of the iPhone 5, I’ve been using the Mophie Juice Pack Powerstation, which is great, but requires a cable.

Want #2 this morning. The Mophie Juice Pack Helium is apparently 13 percent thinner than the Mophie Air version that was popular for the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S (you’d hope so, with more back surface area on the iPhone 5 meaning more battery space). And it should give you a full battery charge.

Since the launch of the iPhone 5, I’ve been using the Mophie Juice Pack Powerstation, which is great, but requires a cable.

Anonymous asked:

Do you use a case on your iphone 5? If so, which one? If not, do you not care about scratches or are you just careful enough not to scratch it up much? Merry christmas and thanks.

I do not use a case. If and when Mophie releases a battery pack case for the iPhone 5, I’ll probably use that from time to time. But generally I’m okay living with a few scuffs here and there — though yes, I am also fairly careful.

Frederic Lardinois reporting for TechCrunch from Microsoft’s Build developer conference:

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced that Microsoft sold 4 million Windows 8 updates since the operating system went on sale last Friday.

That’s 4 million in 3 days. Solid, right? Sure. Though it has to be noted that Apple sold 3 million copies of OS X Mountain Lion in 4 days. Microsoft likes to poke fun at the small OS X install base, and now it works both ways. Apple got nearly as many people to buy the update for OS X in the same amount of time despite a sliver of the overall footprint.

Also, not apples-to-oranges, but even more impressive given the price: Apple sold 5 million iPhones 5s in the first 3 days. Yes, Apple sold more $199-$299 iPhones in the first few days than Microsoft sold $40 Windows 8 updates in the same span.

Chris Velazco for TechCrunch:

Since the only device that fits the description is the iPhone 5, that breaks down to about 651,000 iPhone 5s sold and activated since the device’s launch in September. That may seem a bit on the low side considering the near-religious fervor that iPhone launches tend to inspire, but it’s worth remembering that Apple’s newest smartphone hit the streets just prior to the fiscal quarter’s close.

Right, we’re already seeing a lot of confusion on this, but it’s really not complicated. While Verizon announced their quarterly earnings today, the actual quarter ended around September 30. In other words, the iPhone 5 was on sale for just nine days before the quarter ended. And it was supply-constrained the whole time.

I have no doubt we’re going to see the same level of confusion when Apple announces their earnings next week. The iPhone numbers will be lower than some are expecting because again, it will only include a couple weeks of supply-constrained iPhone 5 sales. Q1 is the real quarter to look at.

Yours truly in my iPhone 5 review on September 18:

Reading the press coverage since the unveiling, you may have heard that the iPhone 5 is disappointing, or boring. Those people, quite frankly, are fools. They either haven’t actually used the device, or only played with it for a few minutes in the hands-on area after last week’s event. (Or worse, they’re projecting their own boredom in their jobs due to Apple’s dominance of the tech scene these past few years.) Using a device on a regular basis is what really matters. And in that regard, the iPhone 5 shines in just about every conceivable way.

Ergo, Farhad Manjoo’s complete 180 today.

Farhad Manjoo has done a 180 on his iPhone 5 stance. “No, This Is Not The Best iPhone Ever" has turned into "The iPhone 5 Is a Miracle". What changed in the past month? Well, Manjoo actually used the device.

Manjoo:

Now, almost a month later, it’s time for me to get something off my chest: I’ve made a huge mistake. I’ve had the iPhone 5 for about a week and a half, and I’m still annoyed about the dock connector thing. But it’s a small problem, and in retrospect I was wrong to allow myself to become overwhelmed by dock-based frustration.

That’s because, in all other ways, the iPhone 5 is the best phone ever to grace the earth. It beats every single rival on just about every metric you can think of, including speed, battery life, and especially beauty and workmanship.

Something I’ve noticed in this past month reminds me quite a bit of the first iPhone: the touch factor. That is, some people seem unimpressed when they first hear about the new iPhone. But then they use it and they immediately need one.

I’ve personally heard about and/or seen this a dozen times so far with the iPhone 5.

I was actually this way (believe it or not) with the first iPhone simply because I was never a person who used a phone all that often. But that was my mistake, thinking about it as a phone — you know, a device that makes calls — when it’s so much more. I didn’t fully understand this until I used the device at an Apple Store.

The iPhone 5 is obviously a bit different. Some people seem underwhelmed because the device looks similar to previous iPhones. And some of the specs sound similar to a bunch of other phones out there. But then you pick it up…

Anonymous asked:

Why did Apple release iPhone 5 close to Q4 ending, and as a result, split the revenues between Q4 & Q1? That's unlike the iPhone 4S's release, which had its enormous impact solely on their previous Q1 results.

That’s correct, the iPhone 5’s financial impact will be split a bit between Q4 (being announced on October 25) and Q1. Still, most of the impact will be in Q1. I’m not sure the exact closing date of Apple’s Q4, but it was around September 30, which means roughly nine days of iPhone 5 sales would have been counted (including the 5 million sold in the first weekend).