#logos

Arash Markazi:

Even worse than being named after a sailing ship that has been out of commission since the 19th century is the Clippers’ logo. It’s a knockoff of the Lakers’ logo, which was introduced when Sterling took over the team in 1982 with an eye toward relocating the team to Los Angeles.

It’s the sports version of opening up McDowell’s across the street from McDonald’s.

It basically looks like Sterling showed the Lakers logo, which had been around since 1960, to someone and asked for it to be copied as best as it possibly could without getting him sued for copyright infringement.

Agreed on both the name change, and the ridiculous logo. But what should Steve Ballmer rename them to?

Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke. Don’t make a ‘Clippy’ joke.

Why was upside down from the user’s perspective an issue? Because the design group noticed that users constantly tried to open the laptop from the wrong end. Steve Jobs always focuses on providing the best possible user experience and believed that it was more important to satisfy the user than the onlooker.

Joe Moreno, formerly of Apple, talking about why the company made the call to go with a logo that was upside down (from an onlooker’s perspective) on older Apple laptops.

Of course, Apple eventually corrected this problem. As Moreno notes:

Opening a laptop from the wrong end is a self-correcting problem that only lasts for a few seconds. However, viewing the upside logo is a problem that lasts indefinitely.