#media

Thomas Fuller on the newly freed media struggling in Myanmar:

Daw Nyein Nyein Naing, the executive editor at The 7 Day Daily, one of the new newspapers, said finding good reporters had been difficult. Her reporters are addicted to Facebook, she said, and often post scoops to their Facebook pages, rather than filing stories to their editors.

She also lamented that many readers appeared to prefer dailies and weeklies that she said ran sensational articles of dubious veracity. “People are not buying quality,” she said.

Even in the newest of places, with the best intentions, history repeats.

David Carr on the inevitable end of the current television paradigm:

It is a truism of all businesses, especially media, that once the consumer decides how things are going to go, it is only a matter of time before disruption occurs in fundamental ways. Just ask the record companies. And for now, the disrupters not only have the consumer on their side, but the law as well.

From a media perspective, this idea has always interested me. Eventually, you put everything on the web, but you give paying customers first crack at it.

Of course, it works for huge stories like an exclusive look at Apple — which I paid $4.99 for just like everyone else. But it’s a much harder sell for most things.

Still, if you prove time and time again that you have great content, a small percentage (your biggest fans and maybe even your biggest haters) would pay to get it early. 

One vocal and visible critic of AT&T service, TechCrunch blogger MG Siegler, thinks acknowledging holes in service and outreach might be able to quell at least some backlash for the brand. “It’s enough for a certain percentage of people,” he said. “A lot of people complain about Comcast, but when they get someone person-to-person reaching out, a lot of people feel better, even if it doesn’t actually serve long-term problems.”

In other words, trick people into thinking your service doesn’t suck. 

This springs from the side of the page on NYT articles, but only when you get to the bottom. Seems like a pretty good idea. It alerts the reader to more content they may like (rather than just having a bunch of links at the bottom that most people skip over), but only once they’re done reading the current content.

This springs from the side of the page on NYT articles, but only when you get to the bottom. Seems like a pretty good idea. It alerts the reader to more content they may like (rather than just having a bunch of links at the bottom that most people skip over), but only once they’re done reading the current content.