#meg whitman

The company faces an extended period of uncertainty and transition that will not be good for its customers.

HP Chief Meg Whitman in a statement about the Dell buyout deal.

But what’s great about the comment is that it just as easily could apply to HP. From October of last year:

Ms. Whitman told a meeting of Wall Street analysts that they should expect sharply lower revenue and profits. She also told them not to expect the company to fully right itself before 2016. “We have much more work to do,” she said.

In other words, the company faces an extended period of uncertainty and transition that will not be good for its customers.

Ashlee Vance and Aaron Ricadela did an extensive look at Meg Whitman and HP for Businessweek — one great anecdote from the Leo Apotheker era:

As one high-ranking former executive in the services business recalls, at his first meeting with Apotheker—to provide the lowdown on the services business—he and a dozen people gathered in a conference room to hear the presentation, only to watch as Apotheker nodded off. The group waited uncomfortably for about 15 minutes. The CEO woke up and, to the gathering’s collective astonishment, said he wanted to move quickly past the financial details of the business, in order to talk about less specific customer satisfaction initiatives,

Perhaps unfair to single out one instance of a man nodding off in a meeting, but seems pretty apt given HP’s last few years.