#music

We said ‘Hi’ to everyone and launched into ‘Lithium’. I picked up a Nirvana tab book a week before to re-learn my parts, but we weren’t up to speed at first. But then it started to flow and it got better and better. Then it hit me and I got kind of somber. I was like, ‘Oh my God. I’m playing these songs again.’
Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic, speaking to Andy Greene (as did Dave Grohl) about the band’s reunion leading up to their Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction. 
The first time we played together, it was like seeing a ghost. The second time, it was a little more reserved. And the last time we played it was like that fucking Demi Moore/Patrick Swayze pottery wheel scene from Ghost. We usually got the song by the third take. It started to sound like Nirvana. Our road crew and some friends were in the room when we launched into ‘Scentless Apprentice’ for the first time. Their were jaws on the floor.
Dave Grohl, talking to Andy Greene about what the rehearsal process was like for the Nirvana reunion that happened for the band’s induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Joshua Hunt:

Commissaries often carry other, bargain-brand radios, but according to former inmates and employees of the Bureau of Prisons and the Keefe Group, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, America’s federal prisoners are most likely to own a Sony. Melissa Dolan, a Sony spokesperson, confirmed in an e-mail that selling portable radios in American prisons has long been a “stable business” that represents “sizable” sales for the company. Of the models available, the SRF-39FP remains an undisputed classic, still found on commissary lists an impressive fifteen years after its initial release, making it nearly as common behind prison walls as Apple’s iPod once was outside of them, despite competition from newer devices like digital radios and MP3 players.

Fascinating. Though I’m not sure this is a metric Sony would ever want to tout.

Update: David Ulevitch provides the goods. My response.

David Carr’s takeaway from SXSW:

And in a move that might seem redundant given the irony that she had already coated herself with, Lady Gaga invited the performance artist Millie Brown on stage to drink a bottle of neon green liquid and vomit all over her. Her actions — to happily shill for Doritos, then deliver a lecture on the importance of independent thought — perfectly encapsulate the conflicted state of the industry.

(You could say it was a new low, but last year, I saw Public Enemy, musical heroes of my youth, perform “Fight the Power” inside a mock Doritos vending machine.)

At her keynote address on Friday, Lady Gaga thanked Doritos and said plainly, “Without sponsorships, without all these people supporting us, we won’t have any more festivals because record labels don’t have any” money.

This is art.

Ed Christman:

Apple has opened exploratory talks with senior label executives about the possibility of launching an on-demand streaming service that would rival Spotify and Beats Music, according to three people familiar with the talks. Apple is also thinking about adding an iTunes App for Android phones, the Google rival that has been growing faster than the iPhone, these sources said. The surprising discussions are part of a multi-pronged strategy to deal with the double-digit decline in U.S. download sales at Apple’s iTunes Music Store, the largest music retailer.

I’d be surprised to see iTunes for Android — I know, I know, there is iTunes for Windows. But this is an entirely different battleground.

I’d be not-at-all surprised to see a “Spotify-like” version of iTunes. I’m not shocked it hasn’t happened yet given how dominant Apple is in music sales, but it’s so obviously the way of the future. My bet is next year.

I like to debate which television shows have the best opening credit sequences from time to time. Currently, I love Downton Abbey and Game of Thrones — which are basically the opposite of one another. But I now have to throw True Detective into the mix as well.1

SO well done. Amazing song. Better visuals. I would watch the show just to watch this opening each week.


  1. Incidentally, by the same team that did the Game of Thrones opening. 

The Case For Holographic Concerts

I was in Las Vegas last week and managed to see two Cirque du Soleil shows. My favorite part of both shows was actually quite similar. And I suspect we’re going to see a lot more of it in the future.

In The Beatles show (more about that here), things kicked off with giant silhouettes of the band playing one of their songs. This was topped in the Michael Jackson show by a hologram of the artist performing “with” the Cirque artists.

One was great. The other was spectacular.

This begs the question: why don’t we see more of this? That is, live performances of music where holograms (or at least silhouettes) stand in for the missing performers?

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