#music

There are a few things I have witnessed becoming obsolete in the past few years, the first being autographs. I haven’t been asked for an autograph since the invention of the iPhone with a front-facing camera. The only memento ‘kids these days’ want is a selfie. It’s part of the new currency, which seems to be ‘how many followers you have on Instagram.’
Taylor Swift, on the future of the music business. Yes, I just quoted Taylor Swift. But it’s an interesting point about autographs and selfies.

While a lot of this is fear-mongering nonsense, some of what Gordon Kelly puts forward with regard to Apple’s potential use of the Lightning connector for headphones actually makes some sense:

Of more relevance to most people, however, is the new functionality it will bring. Headphones with a Lightning connector would be able to do more than lower/increase volume, end calls and skip tracks. There could be specific app control or even the ability to set a specific app to start when they are connected. Since the Lightning jack can also receive power, not just send it, you could still charge a device by connecting it to your headphones while listening to music.

Imagine a pair of headphones, say, Beats, that used their bulky size to an advantage: as a backup battery for your phone. 

Now look at the bottom of you iPhone. What is the most obvious thing stopping the device from getting even slimmer? That 3.5mm headphone jack. I’m not saying Apple will ditch it anytime soon, but I do believe they will eventually ditch it.

idasein asked:

Do you think Beats Music will be free with an iPhone 6? Spotify-type services are one of those things people don't know they need until they have them. Free Beats Music on iPhone 6 would mean iPhone 6 owners simply have better music than everyone else. "If you don't have an iPhone..." As the technology becomes commoditized, bundling expensive, essential services is a great differentiator. Also 100 million paid subscribers = Apple saves music industry (again).

It’s a good question, but I suspect Apple will maintain the paid offering (with a free trial). You could certainly argue they could and should make it free (paying for the music themselves), but I think they worry just as much about the signal that would send to the music industry. Something like: “your art is just a subsidy we pay to sell more devices” — which, when you think about it, isn’t far from reality. But I highly doubt they want to go in that direction so explicitly. 

We just sat there drinking beer and watching incessant Kenny G. It was terrible.
Jackie Subeck, a music and entertainment consultant from Los Angeles who has been doing business in China for 12 years, talking about the country’s obsession with “Going Home”, Kenny G’s 1989 song that’s ubiquitous in the country to denote the closing of stores/schools/bars/etc.
We said ‘Hi’ to everyone and launched into ‘Lithium’. I picked up a Nirvana tab book a week before to re-learn my parts, but we weren’t up to speed at first. But then it started to flow and it got better and better. Then it hit me and I got kind of somber. I was like, ‘Oh my God. I’m playing these songs again.’
Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic, speaking to Andy Greene (as did Dave Grohl) about the band’s reunion leading up to their Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction. 
The first time we played together, it was like seeing a ghost. The second time, it was a little more reserved. And the last time we played it was like that fucking Demi Moore/Patrick Swayze pottery wheel scene from Ghost. We usually got the song by the third take. It started to sound like Nirvana. Our road crew and some friends were in the room when we launched into ‘Scentless Apprentice’ for the first time. Their were jaws on the floor.
Dave Grohl, talking to Andy Greene about what the rehearsal process was like for the Nirvana reunion that happened for the band’s induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.