#nike

Nick Statt:

Nike is gearing up to shutter its wearable-hardware efforts, and the sportswear company this week fired the majority of the team responsible for the development of its FuelBand fitness tracker, a person familiar with the matter told CNET.

Yikes. Though the reality is that this seemed inevitable as something Apple this way comes:

As Apple enters the fray, Nike has a potential partner. Apple CEO Tim Cook, who was seen wearing a FuelBand at the company’s launch of the iPad mini in October of 2012, sits on Nike’s board, and has for the last nine years. That relationship has been fruitful over the years, helping Nike enter the wearable market as early as 2006, with the Nike+iPod shoe sensor package, with a strong brand partner.

I’ve been saying this for a while: Tim Cook remaining on Nike’s board while Apple readies its own health/fitness-focused device was awkward at best. Unless Nike decided to exit that business and instead partner with Apple on such a device…

(As an aside, Secret strikes first again on this news.)

Update: Nike has issued a fairly standard non-denial, denial. They’re admitting to the layoffs, but dismissing the notion that the FuelBand is being killed off. To which I say, as always with these types of statements: yet.

(Of course they’re not going to admit to killing the FuelBand right now, there is still product on the shelves — not to mention new color variations, long in the pipeline, about to launch. They could either kill the product and sell none of those or postpone that announcement and sell at least some of those. No-brainer.)

An insanely detailed leak of Apple’s forthcoming Healthbook software (likely a part of iOS 8) by Mark Gurman:

Each category of functionality is a card in the Healthbook. Cards are distinguished by a color, and the tabs can be arranged to fit user preferences. As can be seen in the above images, Healthbook has sections that can track data pertaining to bloodwork, heart rate, hydration, blood pressure, physical activity, nutrition, blood sugar, sleep, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and weight.

The big question, as Gurman notes at the end, is which devices will supply the data to Healthbook? Certainly, the iPhone itself is one (especially the models with an M7 chip). And it sure sounds like some sort of forthcoming “iWatch" would be another. But given the scope of Healthbook, it also seems likely to me that Apple will allow third-party devices to work with the software. This being Apple, you can be sure such a list will be curated, at least at first.

To that end, just remember that Tim Cook remains on Nike’s Board of Directors…

Joshua Brustein:

The biggest prize for Nike may have come last week, when Apple (AAPL) said its new iPhone would have sensors allowing people to use their phones to keep track of their Fuel points. Apple’s oft-predicted, never-confirmed smartwatch would presumably be a major threat to the FuelBand, but the two companies seem pretty cozy right now. Nike said on Tuesday that it still has no plans to make a Nike+ app for Android, and Olander indicated there are too many devices on the Android operating system to offer a consistent user experience. (He didn’t mention anything about Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook’s presence on Nike’s board.)

Maybe this is naiveté, but given all the signals between the two companies recently (number one being that Tim Cook is still on Nike’s board), I’m starting to be more sure that any wearable Apple does will be in cooperation with Nike, not opposed to them. 

Nike sells a commodity, they sell shoes. And yet when you think of Nike you feel something different than a shoe company. In their ads, as you know, they don’t ever talk about the product, they don’t ever talk about their air soles, how they’re better than Reebok’s air soles. What’s Nike do in their advertising? They honor great athletes and they honor great athletics. That’s who they are. That is what they are about.
Steve Jobs, during a town hall meeting with employees before unveiling the “Think Different” campaign in 1997.

I swear I just read something about Dick Tracy and Apple’s iWatch… Oh, that’s right: I wrote it 10 days ago.

But Nick Bilton of NYT does add quite a bit to the notion, namely sources pointing to the use of curved glass (WSJ follows this up with a largely "us too" article). He also writes:

Mr. Cook is clearly interested in wearables. In the past he has been seen sporting a Nike FuelBand, which tracks a user’s daily exertion. The FuelBand data is shared wirelessly with an iPhone app.

And he has a picture at the top of the post featuring Tim Cook wearing a FuelBand. Oddly not mentioned though is the fact that Cook has a very good reason to be wearing the device: he’s on Nike’s board of directors.

That brings up another interesting question: if and when Apple does move into this space, what would this mean for Cook’s role on Nike’s board? It’s a situation that could play out in a similar way to Eric Schmidt on Apple’s board a few years back.

At first, Schmidt would recuse himself from the parts of meetings where the iPhone was being discussed (once Google’s Android plans were revealed). Then the conflict became too great. And this eventually led to him stepping down (or being pushed) from the board. Maybe Nike doesn’t view the FuelBand as a massive business to be protected right now, but down the road…

thepersonalnetwork

thepersonalnetwork:

Your alarm goes off at six a.m. It’s a good day for a run, so you tie your laces and step out the door. The first steps work out the morning stiffness but you start to hit your stride, and soon you’ve reached your route’s first hill. Your legs are beginning an early burn. Then through your…

Big update to Path today — their first API partner, Nike. Right now, you can push your running data to Path and soon you’ll be able to pull in data right from the FuelBand. 

Something else awesome: when people see you’re running they can take action to virtually “cheer” you along the way. If you have your headphones in, you’ll hear a cheer.

These types of real-world integrations show a glimpse of the huge potential for the service as a platform. A fully mobile platform.

Path 2.1 also has some great updates to the Music and Photo features. Find it in the App Store here

Update: And visit this site for more slickness on the Nike integration.

Disclosure: CrunchFund is an investor in Path — because it’s awesome and we invest in awesome things.