#parislemon

kenrpapp asked:

Do you have an RSS feed for your #500 posts? If not, I could probably filter your @lemonfeed by using "[500 Words]." Thanks.

Sadly, I do not. Perhaps if there was enough demand I could fairly easily set one up. Then again, it is RSS. Maybe better to make a separate Twitter account?

Update: As a number of you have pointed out, Tumblr actually makes this quite easy as there is an RSS feed for your tags by default! Here’s the link to the 500 Words RSS feed. Thanks all.

giantcypress asked:

Given that you’re planning on regularly writing ~500 word posts, is there any way to not have to click on the “Read More” link to read the whole article? I’m not sure that forcing readers to click on a link to finish reading a post helps anything, and some of your link entries are as long as a ~500 word post would be. Allowing the whole post to be read on the front page would be of great help in terms of reading through your blog. Thanks!

I’ve thought about this quite a bit, actually. The main issue is that I don’t want these posts to overwhelm readers on either my site or on Tumblr. Even 500-word posts can be significantly longer than usual Tumblr fodder and interrupt the flow of the feed.

I know that I personally don’t like seeing these lengthy posts in my Tumblr feed — even if I want to read the post!

Having said that, I’m still thinking about it. I don’t love the “Read More” option either. I’m honestly just trying to make a better experience for followers, so your feedback is noted!

Anonymous asked:

I totally get wanting to experiment with the different layouts. However, I personally disliked every time you've done the new, current spread of posts across the screen as opposed to the list or dual-list format. Not only is it difficult to sort out the new posts, but it is difficult to see any actual commentary you added to the posts (you have to manually click each one instead of scanning). Just my two cents, love your writing.

Yeah, I hear you. Just playing around with a few different things. Regular reverse-chron timeline view still available on mobile/tablet! I just get bored with it on the desktop where there’s so much more screen real estate. But we’ll see. Appreciate the feedback.

Anonymous asked:

please fix your RSS feed, its not escaping html tags so its just of tags instead of text/images

Honestly, I’ve tried to look into this and have no idea what’s up here. My guess is that it’s something Tumblr recently changed, but it could well be Feedburner (which Google should probably just kill off already). If anyone has any ideas, I’m all ears.

I’ve looked at the feeds on all available RSS readers and I can’t seem to recreate the problem myself. But I’ve gotten pinged about the raw HTML issue a few hundred times, so it’s clearly very real.

My advice is to perhaps try the raw RSS feed found here: http://parislemon.com/rss.

Or stop using RSS, it’s dead anyway. (I kid, I kid. Sort of.) You can always find the Twitter feed of all posts here: https://twitter.com/lemonfeed.

Sorry for the trouble, thanks for reading.

A little while ago, I hacked together a “Stuff I Like” area at the bottom of this blog. A lot of Tumblr themes have this option, but even more don’t seem to take advantage of that data, which surprises me.
I love the “Like” data because it ends up being the easiest way to interact with stuff on Tumblr. I reblog quite a few things these days, but for everything I reblog, I probably Like 50 to 100 things. I use reblog if I think a piece of content will be of particular interest to my audience (or if it’s of particular interest to me) or if I want to add some commentary to something. But there’s still a little more friction in the number of clicks it takes to share something and keystrokes if you’re typing. Like is one click and you’re done.
I like this tiered system for Tumblr — High level: your own post. Medium level: a Reblog. Low level: a Like. And it’s great to be able to surface them all in one place. Those who just care about the stuff you care the most about can follow your feed (either in Tumblr or RSS) and get just what you post and reblog. But those who want to see everything you’re interested in can visit your site and see the Likes as well. 
Like areas also allow for the creation of fascinating juxtapositions such as the one above, which I approve of. This is high art, people.

A little while ago, I hacked together a “Stuff I Like” area at the bottom of this blog. A lot of Tumblr themes have this option, but even more don’t seem to take advantage of that data, which surprises me.

I love the “Like” data because it ends up being the easiest way to interact with stuff on Tumblr. I reblog quite a few things these days, but for everything I reblog, I probably Like 50 to 100 things. I use reblog if I think a piece of content will be of particular interest to my audience (or if it’s of particular interest to me) or if I want to add some commentary to something. But there’s still a little more friction in the number of clicks it takes to share something and keystrokes if you’re typing. Like is one click and you’re done.

I like this tiered system for Tumblr — High level: your own post. Medium level: a Reblog. Low level: a Like. And it’s great to be able to surface them all in one place. Those who just care about the stuff you care the most about can follow your feed (either in Tumblr or RSS) and get just what you post and reblog. But those who want to see everything you’re interested in can visit your site and see the Likes as well. 

Like areas also allow for the creation of fascinating juxtapositions such as the one above, which I approve of. This is high art, people.