#pixar

Borys Kit and Gregg Kilday:

Borrowing a page from Pixar, Lasseter is hands-on at Walt Disney Animation Studios. He gives extensive notes, pores over story reels and even does the first reading with actors and directors. Initially, Pixar animators worried that he was spending too much time at Disney, where he overhauled Bolt and Tangled. Now that the situation has stabilized, he divides his focus. “Both places think he spends too much time at the other place,” says a friend. “That’s the true telling point.”

I had no idea Lasseter was also running Walt Disney Animation Studios — or that WDAS is now on a roll (Frozen just opened with $94 million) while Pixar is in a bit of a funk (with recent layoffs and the next film delayed until 2015).

Anonymous asked:

If Apple were to buy Nintendo, how do you think Nintendo would be managed?

The only way I think it would work is if the company is allowed to run autonomously. That’s obviously not in Apple’s DNA — though Steve Jobs largely did allow Pixar to operate that way (as a stand-alone separate company, of course), and now Disney seems to as well.

The big issue that everyone brings up with regard to this is Nintendo’s unwillingness to sell, and certainly not to an American company. I just can’t see how this would ever work if Apple tried to buy the company and forced them under the control of Cupertino. The blood would probably be bad on both sides. 

Two things stand out from the story by Brooks Barnes about Disney’s upcoming roadmap. First:

Even so, Disney must pull off several high-wire acts over the coming year. For the first time in nine years, for instance, the company’s highly successful Pixar division will not supply an annual movie; “The Good Dinosaur” was pushed back because of production problems. That puts more box-office pressure on expensive live-action films like “Maleficent,” which is scheduled for release in the spring. Walt Disney World in the coming months is expected to finally introduce its long-planned My Magic Plus technology, a complex advance reservation and crowd management system that cost roughly $1 billion to install; Wall Street is eager for results. Construction spending at Shanghai Disneyland will speed up as the company hurtles toward an opening in late 2015.

The adoption of the My Magic Plus technology should be fascinating to watch. But more importantly, no Pixar movie in 2014 for the first time in nine years?!

Also:

The Netflix deal represents an effort by Disney to replicate Marvel’s successful “Avengers” movie strategy on smaller screens. The company first made stand-alone films for characters like Iron Man and Captain America and then combined the characters into one megamovie. The second Avengers film, “Age of Ultron,” is expected to arrive in theaters in summer 2015. The next “Star Wars” movie will arrive in theaters in December 2015, Disney announced on Thursday. A summer date had been anticipated. The slightly later release window will move “Star Wars” into Disney’s 2016 fiscal year, leading to a modest delay in Disney’s efforts to show substantial returns from its Lucasfilm acquisition.

In other words, 2015 is going to bring a new Pixar film after a two-year hiatus, the next Avengers film, and the new Star Wars film. It’s going to be a massive year for the film division.

There’s something wrong with those colors.

Steve Jobs, upon seeing the bricks being used to create the Pixar headquarters.

He had wanted the brick pattern to be like the Hills Brothers Coffee building in San Francisco. And, as Craig Payne, the senior design project manager at Pixar notes:

Sure enough, they took the production brick and they built another panel next to the one that he approved, and one of the colors was off.

Attention to detail. Always.

[via 9to5Mac]

brad-t asked:

Nintendo is a hardware company. Saying they should put their games on iOS reminds me of everyone saying Apple should license OS X. It doesn't work that way.

I, of course, realize this. But I don’t view the situations as all that similar. Apple fell because it was mismanaged over several years. Nintendo has fallen because the world has simply changed around them very rapidly. (Remember how insanely popular the Wii was just a few years ago?) And it’s not going back.

They need to become the Pixar of the gaming world — another company which focused on hardware once upon a time.

Germain Lussier for /Film:

The studio that helped pioneer 2D, hand drawn, theatrical animation is currently at a crossroads with the process. At Wednesday’s Walt Disney Company shareholder’s meeting, CEO Bob Iger revealed none of Disney’s animation companies, which includes Disney Animation, Pixar and Disney Toons, are currently developing, or have plans to develop, any 2D, hand drawn animation for the big screen. He’s not ruling it out, but the current slate  - which probably stretches 3-4 years – has none of it.

The end of an era. Just imagine if Disney had not bought Pixar — and that would not have happened if Michael Eisner remained as CEO instead of getting replace by Bob Iger. Disney could have been in a lot of trouble right now…

Sometimes acquisitions don’t work. Sometimes they’re the only thing that works. 

Justine Sharrock for BuzzFeed on Matt Jones (best known for his work with Pixar) working with Facebook on a new class of emoticons:


  Right now, Jones is experimenting with colors beyond the default yellow used in most other emoticons. He tried “Facebook blue,” thinking it might have become familiar enough to users, but said the emoticons just looked like they had hypothermia. He’s experimenting with multiple colors: red for anger, green for envy. “But you don’t want to offend anyone,” he explains. “Colors will be a racial issue.”


I was never a big emoticon user until about a year ago when I enabled them on my iPhone. Now I’m addicted. You can convey so much without typing.

(I also love that BuzzFeed has adopted the to-the-top button found on Tumblr.)

Justine Sharrock for BuzzFeed on Matt Jones (best known for his work with Pixar) working with Facebook on a new class of emoticons:

Right now, Jones is experimenting with colors beyond the default yellow used in most other emoticons. He tried “Facebook blue,” thinking it might have become familiar enough to users, but said the emoticons just looked like they had hypothermia. He’s experimenting with multiple colors: red for anger, green for envy. “But you don’t want to offend anyone,” he explains. “Colors will be a racial issue.”

I was never a big emoticon user until about a year ago when I enabled them on my iPhone. Now I’m addicted. You can convey so much without typing.

(I also love that BuzzFeed has adopted the to-the-top button found on Tumblr.)

Claude Brodesser-Akner:

Informed sources tell Vulture that Star Wars: Episode VII has found a leading candidate to write the film’s screenplay: Michael Arndt, the Pixar favorite who was nominated for an Oscar for Toy Story 3, won an Oscar for Little Miss Sunshine, and wrote The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, which is currently shooting. Insiders confirm that Arndt has written a 40- to 50-page treatment for the film and is likely to be at least one of the writers when the Disney/Lucasfilm project begins shooting in 2014.

Great news. Hopefully this is the beginning of an expansive Pixar/Star Wars talent share.

[via @panzer]