#reading

Shane Parrish on one secret of Warren Buffett:

How to get smarter

Read. A lot.

Warren Buffett says, “I just sit in my office and read all day.”

What does that mean? He estimates that he spends 80 percent of his working day reading and thinking.

"You could hardly find a partnership in which two people settle on reading more hours of the day than in ours," Charlie Munger commented.

When asked how to get smarter, Buffett once held up stacks of paper and said he “read 500 pages like this every day. That’s how knowledge builds up, like compound interest.”

I try to adhere to this as well. But it’s a hell of a lot harder than it seems.

Given my post on libraries, a few folks linked me to this recent piece by author Neil Gaiman. My favorite part:

I was in China in 2007, at the first party-approved science fiction and fantasy convention in Chinese history. And at one point I took a top official aside and asked him: Why? Science fiction had been disapproved of for a long time. What had changed?

It’s simple, he told me. The Chinese were brilliant at making things if other people brought them the plans. But they did not innovate and they did not invent. They did not imagine. So they sent a delegation to the US, to Apple, to Microsoft, to Google, and they asked the people there who were inventing the future about themselves. And they found that all of them had read science fiction when they were boys or girls.

To have imagination, you have to spark imagination.

dbreunig
dbreunig:


So good.
Update: If I were Instapaper I’d be recording app usage information, especially length of reading session, start time reading, and location. Using these, I’d build types of reading moments: morning commute, lunchtime, waiting for a flight, before bed… Each of these would be mapped to moments in your day when I expect them to occur, and for how long.
Then, I’d build a feature which could proactively buzz users at times and locations where I expect reading to occur, with a piece just the right length for the moment.


Yeah, great feature (and good suggestion).

dbreunig:

So good.

Update: If I were Instapaper I’d be recording app usage information, especially length of reading session, start time reading, and location. Using these, I’d build types of reading moments: morning commute, lunchtime, waiting for a flight, before bed… Each of these would be mapped to moments in your day when I expect them to occur, and for how long.

Then, I’d build a feature which could proactively buzz users at times and locations where I expect reading to occur, with a piece just the right length for the moment.

Yeah, great feature (and good suggestion).

mattruby asked:

About a year ago you wrote about the iPad mini fitting into your device lineup. I have an iPad mini and I'm wondering if your Kindle Paperwhite still gets any use. Is it worth picking up a Paperwhite as well? What do you think of the benefits of the Kindle inventory and the lending library vs iBooks inventory?

I do use the Kindle Paperwhite on nearly a nightly basis. After staring a backlit screens all day long, I still find the Paperwhite nice on my eyes before I go to sleep. I’m also about to take off to a beach for the long weekend and it’s definitely great in that setting. 

Overall, the Kindle inventory and lending library aspect seems better than iBooks, but I actually like the look of iBooks better. Kindle has been getting better at removing some of the cruft in the reading experience, but there’s still more to go. 

Long story short: I don’t really use the iPad mini for reading books, but I use it all the time for reading the internet. I use the Kindle Paperwhite for reading books. We’ll see if a retina iPad mini changes that equation.

Caroline Winter for Bloomberg Businessweek:

Content, available in English, will initially be free. When readers log on to the site for the first time, they’ll receive a certain number of points—Chang calls them “karma points”—which will slowly be depleted as they click through articles. To restock on points and maintain access, they will have to share the site’s stories through social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter. It’s a bit like multilevel marketing—the more readers spread articles, the greater their access. Those who bristle at being asked to share content can buy points; five points will cost 99¢. “I’m sort of riding off of a gaming model where, instead of pay to play, you can share to play,” Chang says.

Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer a world where people share articles because they think they’d be useful for others to read, not because they want to get points.