#safari

Nilay Patel reviewing the new 13-inch MacBook Air:

13 hours and 29 minutes. That’s all you really need to know — that’s how long the new MacBook Air running Safari lasted running The Verge Battery Test, which cycles through a series of websites and images at 65 percent brightness. Run time in Chrome was shorter, at 11 hours and 29 minutes, but both are still ridiculously impressive. In fact, it’s the record for a laptop running our test without an external battery.

A few of my own thoughts:

1) Wow.

2) And this is running OS X Mountain Lion — OS X Mavericks is supposed to come with even more battery optimizations when it ships in the fall. That’s scary to think about.

3) I’ve noticed this about Safari versus Chrome as well on my laptops. No idea why that is.

Don Melton on the unveiling of Safari:

What you also can’t hear on the video is someone about 15 to 20 rows behind where we were sitting — obviously expecting the word “Gecko” up there — shout at what seemed like the top of his lungs:

“WHAT THE FUCK!?”

KHTML may have been a bigger surprise than Apple doing a browser at all. And that moment was glorious. We had punk’d the entire crowd.

lilly
lilly:

Not exactly news, but lots of good 3rd party apps replacing Apple’s built-in apps. I also like gmail (on iPhone, but not on tablet) and Calvetica, but here’s my current dock. Anyone using anything better for contacts & outbound dialing?

Ditto on Mailbox replacing Mail and Fantastical replacing Calendar (though I use both since I much prefer the month-view of the built-in Calendar). I’m still Safari over Chrome on iOS. Love the fast tab-switching (by swiping left and right) but none of my bookmarklets seem to work yet on Chrome for iOS. Also, I do notice it rendering a tad bit slower than Safari for certain sites.
As for Phone, what is that? Is that like an app to test your hearing that people born before 1980 use? Not clear why anyone would use that.

lilly:

Not exactly news, but lots of good 3rd party apps replacing Apple’s built-in apps. I also like gmail (on iPhone, but not on tablet) and Calvetica, but here’s my current dock. Anyone using anything better for contacts & outbound dialing?

Ditto on Mailbox replacing Mail and Fantastical replacing Calendar (though I use both since I much prefer the month-view of the built-in Calendar). I’m still Safari over Chrome on iOS. Love the fast tab-switching (by swiping left and right) but none of my bookmarklets seem to work yet on Chrome for iOS. Also, I do notice it rendering a tad bit slower than Safari for certain sites.

As for Phone, what is that? Is that like an app to test your hearing that people born before 1980 use? Not clear why anyone would use that.

Gregg Keizer for Computerworld:

Adobe today issued a surprise update for Flash Player that patched 25 critical vulnerabilities in the ubiquitous media software.

It’s great that Microsoft can drop everything else they’re doing to try to match Google’s speed in fixing critical vulnerabilities in a third-party piece-of-shit plug-in. But I prefer Apple’s method: stop supporting Flash.

My Safari web browser is shockingly unaffected by these latest 25 vulnerabilities.

quipol asked:

Why hasn't Safari introduced the consolidated search and address bar? Is it a patent thing, or do you think Apple believes the UX is better with its current approach.

On the Mac, I think it’s coming very, very soon (check the dev builds right now). On iOS, I’m not sure. Perhaps Apple feels like since both boxes are one touch away, it makes sense to separate them. But the new Chrome for iOS has it, so maybe it will change their mind. 

The writing has been on the wall for this for some time. Chrome is great and IE hasn’t done anything interesting in years — the recipe for disruption. I suspect Google themselves will announce this milestone soon.

Next up: the battle for mobile browsing dominance. Safari clearly has the lead here right now, but Google is pushing hard with Chrome for Android. Next up: Chrome for iOS?

John Gruber filed the following Safari “bug” report:

Summary: In previous versions of Safari, there was a relatively narrow maximum width for tabs. This max width would come into play in windows with few tabs (1, 2, maybe 3). In Safari 5.2, tabs consume the full width of the window, even if there are only one or two tabs. I find that this is aesthetically unpleasing, and would like to see the old tab bar return.

I agree completely. The new Safari (5.2, still in beta) is very, very good. By far the best version of Safari yet — to the point where, yes, I’m actually using it instead of Chrome. But the tabs are ridiculous.

The same problem exists in Safari for the iPad.

Safari 5.2 now has an “omnibox” — a URL box from which you can search the web as well. Now they need to borrow the pinned tabs idea too. 

Update: David Chartier disagrees. I think his touch argument is certainly a fair point, but I’d still make the tabs smaller — touchable-width. Gruber follows up with one potential compromise. 

Back From That Safari

A couple weeks ago, I noted that I was going to try using Safari as my main browser. I lasted about a week. For this past week I’ve been back on Chrome, where I’m going to stay.

I take some shit for my undying love of Apple products, but the truth remains — as I’ve always said — that the only requirement for me using anything is that it has to be what I consider the best. Safari is not the best browser, in my mind. Chrome is. 

In my week of using Safari, I have never seen so many beachballs. I have no idea why this was the case day in and day out, I was just doing regular browsing. The type of browsing that Chrome never has any problems with.

In general, Safari seemed noticeably slower than Chrome on everything from startup to rendering. And there were a number of quirks I saw when browsing certain pages that I don’t see with Chrome.

The extensions for Safari were also pretty meh. There are a few good ones, but most seem unnecessarily bloated. 

To be honest, it’s a bit odd to see such a key Apple product that is getting beaten so badly. And it’s weird since I consider mobile Safari to be superior to mobile Chrome. All of the above are based on WebKit.

As I noted, one reason why I wanted to try going back to Safari was that Chrome insisted on coming bundled with Flash, and it causes the browser to crash quite regularly. So I’ve just deactivated it in the browser now. Works like a charm. No crashes yet.

The time with Safari reaffirmed my love for Chrome’s Omnibox and Pinned Tabs. I understand why some people like to have a separate search box, but my god, it just seems like a waste of space to me. As does full size tabs for things like Gmail which I always have open.

Anyways, I’m happy to be back on Chrome.

On A Safari

For no good reason, I decided to use Safari as my main browser today. Actually, there is a pretty decent reason: this. Flash can apparently shave 2 hours off of battery life on the new MacBook Air (and presumably other Macs as well). Chrome comes with Flash baked-in. Safari does not.

Yes, I have a Flash blocker extension installed on Chrome, but Flash has still been crashing my browser left and right in recent weeks. And it’s the only thing that ever seems to strain any of my computers at all. So I’m testing out the Flash-free Safari.

I’ve already noticed a few things I definitely would miss about Chrome:

1) The Omnibox. I don’t know why on Earth all browsers don’t have this. It’s just sort of silly to have two input boxes, one for URLs and one for search. Why not just have one input box to rule them all?

2) Pinned tabs. Tabs in Safari that I always have open, like Gmail, take up way too much space. On the flip-side, it’s nice to be able to see unread counts again.

3) New related tabs opening next to your current tab. A small thing, but I prefer this over related tabs opening at the end of the tab bar (which Safari does).

4) Tab overview. On the Mac version of Chrome, there’s a flag (formerly Labs) you can enable to allow a three-finger swipe down to show you an overview of all the tabs you have open — just like Expose for apps on the Mac. 

Other than that, so far, so good. As a bonus, I’ve noticed that New Twitter is a lot less buggy in Safari too.