#sandy

dbreunig
dbreunig:

Next Nature writes:


  Anheuser-Busch, parent company of the American beer brand Budweiser, has been canning water for victims of the disaster. The company temporarily converted one of its manufacturing facilities from churning out bland beer to life-giving water. The result is uncanny: A beer can with the familiar eagle logo of Budweiser, now filled with essential, non-alcoholic water. In a world where corporations often have more power than governments, it is not surprising that in times of crisis they respond faster than “official” organizations, and are better equipped to do so.


Big beverage companies have always-on logistical pipelines much better equipped to deliver water aide than ad-hoc government systems, and such efforts are a canny use of local marketing budgets.

One day I’ll write out some longer thoughts regarding relief marketing. It’s a tangled subject.

*No word on whether anyone noticed a taste difference. (Via NextNature.net)

"Non-alcoholic water." Pretty great.

dbreunig:

Next Nature writes:

Anheuser-Busch, parent company of the American beer brand Budweiser, has been canning water for victims of the disaster. The company temporarily converted one of its manufacturing facilities from churning out bland beer to life-giving water. The result is uncanny: A beer can with the familiar eagle logo of Budweiser, now filled with essential, non-alcoholic water. In a world where corporations often have more power than governments, it is not surprising that in times of crisis they respond faster than “official” organizations, and are better equipped to do so.

Big beverage companies have always-on logistical pipelines much better equipped to deliver water aide than ad-hoc government systems, and such efforts are a canny use of local marketing budgets.

One day I’ll write out some longer thoughts regarding relief marketing. It’s a tangled subject.

*No word on whether anyone noticed a taste difference. (Via NextNature.net)

"Non-alcoholic water." Pretty great.

Philip Elmer-DeWitt on the “short" iPad mini lines:

But shortly before 8 a.m., when the store usually opens for a new launch, I had a headcount of 550. According to the records Piper Jaffray’s Gene Munster has been keeping since 2008 (see below), that’s more customers than turned out for the iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4S.

Sure, just one data point, but a good one — especially when you consider the Hurricane Sandy situation. A lot of people in New York still don’t have power, but damnit, they will have iPad minis.