#satya nadella

Ben Thompson makes the case as to why new Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella should kill off the Surface product line:

This here is the greatest danger of forgetting your original goal; you start making up new ones, that are basically “because we need it to exist.” The hardware capability that Nadella claims Surface leverages only exists because of the decision to make Surface. Nadella is basically saying Microsoft needs to make Surface because Microsoft makes Surface. With that sort of reasoning, you can continue on a wrong path forever, just like the Xbox.

I was thinking this very thing last night after hearing Nadella speak at the Code Conference. He often seems to be making the case for many of Microsoft’s products because they already exist, not because they should exist. As he did with the Surface Mini, I expect him to trim.

Dina Bass and Ian King on why we didn’t see a “Surface Mini” at Microsoft “small" Surface event this week:

Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella and Executive Vice President Stephen Elop decided that the product in development wasn’t different enough from rivals and probably wouldn’t be a hit, said one of the people, who asked not to be identified because the plans weren’t public. Engineers had been working on the device and had planned to unveil it as early as today at an event in New York, two of the people said.

This is important. It finally seems as if Microsoft has someone in place to say the all-important word: “no.”

Don’t underestimate the importance of this. I’m still not sold on the Surface Pro 3 being the right call either, but at least it makes sense to try to market that as a full-on laptop replacement. The “Surface Mini” would have been another embarrassing flop. Good on them for realizing it before it was too late — even if it was at the last minute.

Satya Nadella:

A great idea shouldn’t have to wait for you to get back to a particular device. An impromptu call with a customer shouldn’t be delayed because you don’t have the right data on hand. Life moves too fast to put limits on where and how you work. Just as the best camera is the one you have with you, sometimes the right device is the one closest at hand. Simply put, our vision is to deliver the best cloud-connected experience on every device.

A few buzzwords aside, this is a great post. Clear and fairly concise. It seems like he gets it.

52 Days

A few tweets of mine today about Microsoft releasing Office for iPad seem to have people up-in-arms. So allow me to clarify.

First, I do think this is an important moment. Not for me, personally, because I still won’t use Office — haven’t in years — but for millions of other people who do and want to use it on their own terms, on their own devices. More importantly, this is important for Microsoft. It’s a grand gesture to suggest they’re finally taking their head out of the sand it has been in for the better part of a decade.

"But, but, but, Microsoft clearly didn’t make Office in 52 days!," they whine. No shit. I’m not saying that Satya Nadella has been the one man hand-coding Office for iPad with both hands tied behind his back for the past 52 days. I’m saying it takes balls for Microsoft to even release Office for iPad at all. Especially now.

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Dina Bass:

Microsoft’s Corp.’s newly appointed Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella, in an effort to reignite growth, is shuffling management and putting former political operative Mark Penn in the new role of chief strategy officer, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Nadella’s mistake number one: not firing this joker.1

Here’s Nadella’s memo confirming this move and the rest of the shakeups on the executive team. And here’s more on Penn within Microsoft.


  1. Though his new role isn’t necessarily a promotion — it’s a shame he’s sticking around at all. 

The Abbreviated Honeymoon Of The New Microsoft CEO

The honeymoon is on. Microsoft finally announced a new CEO yesterday: Satya Nadella. And the blogosphere seemingly could not be more pleased.

And I have to admit, reading all the coverage, Nadella sounds like the right choice. He knows Microsoft. He was leading the one division inside the company without question marks. He knows his tech. And everyone seems to like him.

But all of this overlooks the obvious question: if he seems like such a slam dunk, why wasn’t he?

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