#star wars

Papa Vinyard:

J.J. Abrams may be keeping his cards as close to his chest as humanly possible, but that didn’t stop Disney chairman Bob Iger from letting some basic details slip to investors. At the company’s annual shareholder meeting, Iger revealed some basic info about a few of their projects, including EPISODE VII. Aside from mentioning that it “really looks amazing,” he officially revealed that the film will take place 30 years after RETURN OF THE JEDI (which puts it at approximately 34 ABY in the SW timeline). He also mentioned we’ll be seeing some “familiar faces,” all but confirming that the vets of this franchise, including Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Billy Dee Calrissian, and a certain former carpenter, will be making their triumphant returns in the new installment.

Given that it will have been about 32 1/2 years after the release of JEDI when EPISODE VII finally comes out, it’s not any massive revelation that the SW timeline will just about follow suit accordingly. Plus, any sequel of any sort pretty much assumes you’ll be seeing at least some “familiar faces.” Still, it’s safe to assume that Iger, while not “really in the process,” has total access to any and all SW info he wants, so these tidbits feel like more than uninformed misinformation for the public (like, say, J.J. ASSURING us that Khan wasn’t the INTO DARKNESS villain).

But how old will Jar Jar Binks be?

Two things stand out from the story by Brooks Barnes about Disney’s upcoming roadmap. First:

Even so, Disney must pull off several high-wire acts over the coming year. For the first time in nine years, for instance, the company’s highly successful Pixar division will not supply an annual movie; “The Good Dinosaur” was pushed back because of production problems. That puts more box-office pressure on expensive live-action films like “Maleficent,” which is scheduled for release in the spring. Walt Disney World in the coming months is expected to finally introduce its long-planned My Magic Plus technology, a complex advance reservation and crowd management system that cost roughly $1 billion to install; Wall Street is eager for results. Construction spending at Shanghai Disneyland will speed up as the company hurtles toward an opening in late 2015.

The adoption of the My Magic Plus technology should be fascinating to watch. But more importantly, no Pixar movie in 2014 for the first time in nine years?!

Also:

The Netflix deal represents an effort by Disney to replicate Marvel’s successful “Avengers” movie strategy on smaller screens. The company first made stand-alone films for characters like Iron Man and Captain America and then combined the characters into one megamovie. The second Avengers film, “Age of Ultron,” is expected to arrive in theaters in summer 2015. The next “Star Wars” movie will arrive in theaters in December 2015, Disney announced on Thursday. A summer date had been anticipated. The slightly later release window will move “Star Wars” into Disney’s 2016 fiscal year, leading to a modest delay in Disney’s efforts to show substantial returns from its Lucasfilm acquisition.

In other words, 2015 is going to bring a new Pixar film after a two-year hiatus, the next Avengers film, and the new Star Wars film. It’s going to be a massive year for the film division.

Pamela McClintock:

"Star Wars: Episode VII" will hit theaters Dec. 18, 2015, Lucasfilm and Disney announced Thursday, ending heated speculation as to whether J.J. Abrams’ movie will be done in time for a 2015 release. “We’re very excited to share the official 2015 release date for ‘Star Wars: Episode VII,’ where it will not only anchor the popular holiday filmgoing season but also ensure our extraordinary filmmaking team has the time needed to deliver a sensational picture,” said Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn.

Even better:

Abrams and Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy recently announced that Lawrence Kasdan, who co-wrote 1980’s “Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back,” considered the best film in the “Star Wars” series, is coming aboard to rework the script with Abrams upon the exit of “Episode VII” writer Michael Arndt.

Begun, my excitement has.

Spencer Ackerman breaks down the Battle of Hoth from The Empire Strikes Back for Wired:

At the very most, the Empire’s assault on Hoth killed a couple of low-ranking Rebels and destroyed a few transit ships — which we don’t even see on screen. Instead of crushing the Rebels, it scattered them, leaving them to survive for the additional successes they’ll achieve in Return of the Jedi. It’s a classic fiasco of overconfidence and theology masquerading as military judgment — and the exact opposite of the Empire striking back.

Shared a bunch last week, but too brilliant not to re-tumbl. 

fuckyeahmovieposters
fuckyeahmovieposters:

Star Trek Into Darkness by Sean Hartter

Cannot wait. Also, interesting retro-psychadelic poster. 

And: I wonder if the opening of this film is bolstered by J.J. Abrams’ recently revealed involvement with Star Wars. Obviously, this Star Trek would have been huge regardless, but I wonder if there is some “let’s get a glimpse of the potential style of the next Star Wars" spillover.

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Star Trek Into Darkness by Sean Hartter

Cannot wait. Also, interesting retro-psychadelic poster.

And: I wonder if the opening of this film is bolstered by J.J. Abrams’ recently revealed involvement with Star Wars. Obviously, this Star Trek would have been huge regardless, but I wonder if there is some “let’s get a glimpse of the potential style of the next Star Wars" spillover.