#steve jobs

Kim Masters:

A source with ties to the studio says Fincher potentially could re-enter negotiations but that the fee he is seeking is “ridiculous,” adding, “You’re not doing Transformers here. You’re not doing Captain America. This is quality — it’s not screaming commerciality. He should be rewarded in success but not up front.”

He apparently was asking for a $10 million up-front fee, as well as control over marketing. I say give it to him. Then get Christian Bale.

Andy Hertzfeld on Susan Kare:

One day, I came over to her cubicle to see what she was working on, and I was surprised to see her laboring over a tiny icon portrait of Steve Jobs.
Icons were only 32 by 32 black or white pixels, 1024 dots in total, and I didn’t think it was possible to do a very good portrait in that tiny a space, but somehow Susan had succeeded in crafting an instantly recognizable likeness with a mischevious grin that captured a lot of Steve’s personality. Everyone she showed it to liked it, even Steve himself.

Via Priceonomics’ in-depth look at Kare, definitely worth the read.

Andy Hertzfeld on Susan Kare:

One day, I came over to her cubicle to see what she was working on, and I was surprised to see her laboring over a tiny icon portrait of Steve Jobs.

Icons were only 32 by 32 black or white pixels, 1024 dots in total, and I didn’t think it was possible to do a very good portrait in that tiny a space, but somehow Susan had succeeded in crafting an instantly recognizable likeness with a mischevious grin that captured a lot of Steve’s personality. Everyone she showed it to liked it, even Steve himself.

Via Priceonomics’ in-depth look at Kare, definitely worth the read.

Steve and I spent months and months working on a part of a product that, often, nobody would ever see, nor realize was there. It didn’t make any difference functionally. We did it because we cared, because when you realize how well you can make something, falling short, whether seen or not, feels like failure.
Jony Ive, talking about building Apple products with Steve Jobs during a long sit-down with John Arlidge.

Jeff Sneider:

Oscar winner Christian Bale is David Fincher’s choice to play Steve Jobs in the untitled movie that Aaron Sorkin has written for Sony, an individual familiar with the project has told TheWrap.

While Steve Jobs is a long way from Batman, Bale has been considered a prime contender to play the tech superhero since the project was first announced due to his physical resemblance to the Apple co-founder.

Bale has not been approached to play Jobs yet, as the actor is taking a brief break from the business to spend time with his family since wrapping the role of Moses in Ridley Scott’s “Exodus.” The Biblical epic is expected to have Bale back in the awards conversation.

I would fully endorse this casting choice. Not only is there a physical resemblance, some might say there’s a similar temperament as well.

Yukari Iwatani Kane on Apple under Tim Cook:

Apple under Jobs was a roller coaster, but Cook’s operations fief was orderly and disciplined. Cook knew every detail in every step of the operations processes. Weekly operations meetings could last five to six hours as he ground through every single item. His subordinates soon learned to plan for meetings with him as if they were cramming for an exam. Even a small miss of a couple of hundred units was examined closely. “Your numbers,” one planner recalled him saying flatly, “make me want to jump out that window over there.”

Cook had made a particular point of tackling Apple’s monstrous inventory, which he considered fundamentally evil. He called himself the “Attila the Hun of inventory.”

Meetings with Cook could be terrifying. He exuded a Zenlike calm and didn’t waste words. “Talk about your numbers. Put your spreadsheet up,” he’d say as he nursed a Mountain Dew. (Some staffers wondered why he wasn’t bouncing off the walls from the caffeine.) When Cook turned the spotlight on someone, he hammered them with questions until he was satisfied. “Why is that?” “What do you mean?” “I don’t understand. Why are you not making it clear?” He was known to ask the same exact question 10 times in a row.

No one questions that Tim Cook’s leadership is vastly different from that of Steve Jobs. But that doesn’t necessarily mean he’s any easier to work for. This paints him as demanding, but in different ways.

"It’s sort of like sediment of rocks. You’re building up a mountain and you get to contribute your little layer of sedimentary rock to make the mountain that much higher. But no one on the surface, unless they have X-ray vision, will see your sediment. They’ll stand on it. It’ll be appreciated by that rare geologist."

[via @dflieb]

nerdology

nerdology:

theatlantic:

The Mac Turns 30 Today

Thirty years ago today, Steve Jobs did something he would go on to do many times over: He strode onto a stage and introduced the public to a product that would do its damnedest to dent the universe

Here is, probably, the main thing worth remembering about the launch of the Macintosh: The soundtrack Apple chose for the moment of the machine’s introduction was, hilariously, the theme song from Chariots of Fire.

But here are a few more things to remember as the Mac marks its 30th birthday.

Read more.

That grin on Steve Jobs’ face. You can tell when he’s pleased with himself. Happy birthday Mac.

Showmanship. (Also, I was two years old.)

Seeing as The Newsroom is one of the most “meh” shows of all time, this is the most “meh” news of all time. And naturally, the true lede was buried:

Specifically, Sorkin has been writing the script for a Steve Jobs biopic, which he has since turned in to Sony.

That, of course, is the biopic Aaron Sorkin has been writing based on Walter Isaacson’s book.

Jonathan Mann:

So. Fast forward to 2010. I had just learned that I lost a big video contest, and I was feeling pretty down. It also happened to be the eve of Apple’s “Antenna-Gate” press conference. The anti-Apple hype was at a fever pitch, and I thought the whole non-story was ridiculous. I decided to write a song defending Apple. I hoped that MG would post it, and maybe I’d get some decent traffic. I wrote the song in about 2 hours and spent another hour on the video. I posted the song, sent it to MG and went to bed.

The next morning I woke to a flurry of activity in my inbox, including an email that appeared to be from Apple. I read the email and decided it was fake — someone was trolling me. I was in the shower when my phone rang. It was Apple PR. For real. Could they use my video to open the press conference, they wondered? Um, yes. Sure, uh, how should I send it to you? Jesus Christ.

Later that morning, I watched online as the song and video I had made in 3 hours the night before played before an audience of journalists at Apple HQ. Then Steve Jobs came out on stage and said, “Thanks for coming. We found that on YouTube this morning and couldn’t help but want to share it.” It was one of the most surreal moments of my life. I heard later from the PR rep that Steve had been dancing off stage as the song played. If you watch the video of the event, there’s a few seconds, right as my song ends, that you can see him bopping his way on to the stage.

I can verify all of this, including Jobs bopping his way on to the stage that morning — because I was in the audience. When Mann’s video started playing I could not believe it. And I knew what it was immediately from the opening keys.

Every single Apple event is orchestrated to no end, including the “crisis” ones like they held for “Antennagate” — perhaps even more so in that case (a few of us were invited on a behind-the-scenes tour of the iPhone testing facilities after the press conference). Yet they clearly pulled a last-minute audible to play the video that morning. And Steve Jobs clearly had to sign off on such an idea. It was the definition of savvy.

Serena Saitto, Peter Burrows & Aaron Ricadela dive deep into just what it took to take Dell private. One anecdote from this past summer:

Durban sketched out the LBO idea as they wandered for two hours through the grounds of the beach resort — a practice Dell had picked up from walking meetings he’d had with Apple CEO Steve Jobs in years past.

We often hear about Steve "Fuck Michael Dell" Jobs. But the two clearly had a professional relationship throughout the years as well — such as taking long walks on the beach…

But seriously, what a pain in the ass it was to just give the money back to the shareholders.