#television

I wish we had more episodes. I’d love to have 13 episodes. With 13 episodes, we could include smaller scenes that we had to cut, scenes that make the story deeper and richer.

George R. R. Martin, speaking to Dana Jennings about how his “A Song of Fire and Ice” series of novels compares to HBO’s Games of Thrones television show.

Given the massive ratings success HBO is seeing with Thrones, it seems insane that they wouldn’t okay more episodes if asked. Yes, the show is hugely expensive to produce but it’s now HBO’s most successful series — ever. Plus, ten episodes each season isn’t enough for me either.

James Hibberd

HBO has crowned a new ratings king. Fantasy hit Game of Thrones has officially surpassed mob drama The Sopranos to become the most-watched show in the premium cable network’s history, HBO confirmed for the first time Thursday.

With two episodes remaining in the fourth season, Thrones has an average gross audience of 18.4 million viewers across all platforms. That surpasses the previous record set by the 2002 peak season of The Sopranos, which had an average gross audience of 18.2 million viewers per episode. Last season of Thrones had an average gross audience of 14.4 million viewers per episode. The news comes as Thrones has set several recent ratings records for its own performance this season.

That was three weeks ago, I can only imagine what the ratings for the finale were (we should know in the next few days). 

Update: As expected, those ratings were massive. (Thanks @rjonesy)

I do not like the feeling that I experience when people talk about how much ‘Lost’ sucked. I can no longer acknowledge it. I spent three years acknowledging it. I hear you. I understand. I get it. I’m not in denial about it.

Damon Lindelof, one of the writers of Lost, speaking to Taffy Brodesser-Akner in an interview for The New York Times Magazine.

As someone who had a similar early career, I’m fascinated by his story.

Marc Graser:

While George Lucas had built a world around “Star Wars” through movies, TV shows, comicbooks, novels, videogames and other forms of entertainment, storylines were developed by separate teams creating what’s been called an “Expanded Universe” that veered away from what was seen onscreen by audiences.

As a result of the plethora of “Star Wars”-related characters, creatures, spaceships and worlds created for those properties, Lucasfilm has formed a new story group to oversee all “Stars Wars” creative development, according to Kathleen Kennedy, president of Lucasfilm, that will connect all aspects of storytelling moving forward.

Controversial idea, no doubt. But I think the right one. If Disney is going to utilize the franchise to its full potential, this seems like a must.