#windows rt

Nick Wingfield:

For its full fiscal year, which ended June 30, total Surface sales were only $853 million, Microsoft said in its annual report. By comparison, Apple’s iPad sales during roughly the same time frame were $33.2 billion.

Yikes. But:

As before, the new Surface family includes two products, Surface 2 and Surface Pro 2. The Surface 2, called the RT in the first version…

At least they got the name right this time.

I still do not understand why the Surface (RT) line exists. I get the Surface Pro somewhat (though still don’t love its prospects long-term), but the Surface (RT) is significantly more expensive than any Kindle Fire, has basically no ecosystem when compared to any other Android tablet, and, of course, is no iPad.

I understand the desire to compete on the ARM side of the field, but they’re not really competing. They’re continually putting out a product that’s built to lose.

John Paczkowski:

Nasty allegations and a brutal condemnation of Microsoft’s tablet strategy, which Robbins Geller says has “eviscerated” about $34 billion of Microsoft’s market value. The suit seeks to recover damages on behalf of all purchasers of Microsoft common stock between April 18, 2013, and July 18.

Uh, what about those of us who actually bought the damn thing? I want a piece of that (class) action.

Tom Warren got the skinny on a closed-door meeting in which Steve Ballmer addressed Microsoft employees. The two key takeaways:

"We built a few more devices than we could sell," admitted Ballmer when referring to the slow Surface RT sales. 

"We’re not selling as many Windows devices as we want to," he said, referring to phones, tablets, and PCs.

Shocking.

So if this number is accurate, and if my math is correct, Apple sells as many iPads in roughly 6 days as Microsoft sells Surfaces in roughly 6 months.
Update: From Ian King & Dina Bass’ story for Bloomberg:

Microsoft has sold little more than a million of the Surface RT version and about 400,000 Surface Pros since their debuts, according to three people, who asked not to be named because sales haven’t yet been made public. The company had ordered about 3 million Surface RTs, they said. Brent Thill, an analyst at UBS AG, had initially expected Microsoft to sell 2 million Surface RT devices in the December quarter alone.

Yikes.
And:

Microsoft is taking steps to turn around the tepid demand. The software maker is trying to rejigger its marketing for Surface RT, said two of the people familiar with the company. Microsoft executives have said internally that they failed to persuade some customers to choose Surface over Apple’s iPad or Samsung’s tablets, which run on Google’s Android software, one of the people said.

Marketing. Good luck with that.

So if this number is accurate, and if my math is correct, Apple sells as many iPads in roughly 6 days as Microsoft sells Surfaces in roughly 6 months.

Update: From Ian King & Dina Bass’ story for Bloomberg:

Microsoft has sold little more than a million of the Surface RT version and about 400,000 Surface Pros since their debuts, according to three people, who asked not to be named because sales haven’t yet been made public. The company had ordered about 3 million Surface RTs, they said. Brent Thill, an analyst at UBS AG, had initially expected Microsoft to sell 2 million Surface RT devices in the December quarter alone.

Yikes.

And:

Microsoft is taking steps to turn around the tepid demand. The software maker is trying to rejigger its marketing for Surface RT, said two of the people familiar with the company. Microsoft executives have said internally that they failed to persuade some customers to choose Surface over Apple’s iPad or Samsung’s tablets, which run on Google’s Android software, one of the people said.

Marketing. Good luck with that.

I’m generally wary of these estimates (see: netbook projections from a few years ago), but even if IDC is off by a lot, this should be extremely troubling for Microsoft:

IDC said tablets running Microsoft’s Windows 8 platform would grow their market share from 1 percent last year to 7.4 percent in 2017.

Tablets running the Windows RT operating system, which is not compatible with older software that runs on Windows, will see their market share stay below 3 percent through 2017, IDC said.

The tablet market is expected to be close to 200 million units shipped in 2013. According to IDC, the iPad will control about half of that market with all the various Android tablets controlling the other half. Microsoft will be a non-player.

And even by 2017 — four full years from now — IDC doesn’t think Microsoft will control even 10 percent of the market. Yikes.

Chris Welch for The Verge:

Microsoft has just announced that it will permit Flash content to run by default in both Windows RT and Windows 8 beginning tomorrow, March 12th. Until now, compatibility in Internet Explorer 10 has been limited to a select number of sites whitelisted by Microsoft. 

I was just thinking that I wish there was another reason never to use Internet Explorer 10. Wish granted.

Also, no mention of Silverlight — which says all you need to know about that. 

There wasn’t really a very clear positioning of what Windows RT meant in the marketplace, what it stood for relative to Windows 8, that was being done in an effective manner to the consumer. When we did some tests and studies on how we could go to market with a Windows RT device, we determined there was a lot of heavy lifting we still needed to do to educate the customer on what Windows RT was.

Mike Abary, the head of Samsung’s PC and tablet business in the U.S., explaining to CNET at CES why Samsung was bailing on Windows RT.

It is, what we thought it was. A shitshow.

Tom Warren for The Verge:

We’re told that the large majority of Nokia’s focus with its tablet is on a battery-equipped cover. Nokia will release a special cover for the tablet that envelops it like a book. Clicking into place, the cover provides a keyboard and a kickstand for the tablet. Nokia has also built a battery into the cover that can be used to power the tablet once it runs low on energy. Two USB ports on the case will also provide additional connectivity.

Sounds like a creative idea, especially that it acts as an additional battery. But this cover is the “large majority” of Nokia’s focus? Shouldn’t it be, you know, on the tablet itself?

thenextweb

thenextweb:

However, the most recent ad from Microsoft boosting its tablet line is a mess. Instead of focusing on any single feature of the Surface tablet, or even Windows 8, Microsoft tries to show off every single thing that it can in 30 seconds. Guess how effective that is. (via The latest Surface ad is a confused, spinning, spawn-of-rainbow mess - The Next Web)

Hope you aren’t prone to seizures…

Philip Elmer-DeWitt breaks down the numbers from Piper Jaffray’s Gene Munster, who spent Black Friday at the Mall of America in Minneapolis.

Shoppers at the Apple Store bought an average of 11 iPads per hour. Despite heavy TV, print and billboard advertising for the new Microsoft Surface tablet, not one was sold sold during the two hours Piper Jaffray spent monitoring that store. Doesn’t bode well for Microsoft’s answer to the iPad.

No, no it doesn’t.

One store, sure. But when I went to buy the Surface a few weeks back, I saw exactly one sold in all my time playing around at the kiosk — the one sold to me so I could do my review. On the other hand, I was also in an Apple Store (in Miami) on Black Friday, I’ve never seen such a crowd. And yes, plenty of folks were leaving with Apple bags in their hands.